Sweet White gig w/ Monet EP review 

As I walked into the Edinburgh venue Peterhead band Sweet White were playing at, there was an overwhelming sense that something wasn’t quite right. “It looks like something out of Twin Peaks” quipped frontman Jake Cordiner as the band to prepared to go on stage.

As they began to play, the same amazing surrealism that the cult 90’s TV show provided was there for all to see at the Voodoo Rooms tonight as Cordiner and Co possessed everyone’s attention.


Promoting their new EP, titled Monet, the boys weren’t shy to show off their new material. Take for instance the opening track Tides, which recently was released alongside a well directed music video, that features some great lyrical content alongside a spectacular breakdown.

The title track Monet shared the same nature as Tides, featuring a spectacular riff that would make Foals jealous. Jenine was a song that was difficult not to hum to myself on the walk back to my train, with a hook so catchy that it expertly reflects the pop elements that the band unashamedly embrace.


That’s not to say there weren’t any golden oldies, a term that you don’t find yourself often using when describing an up and coming band. There’s a track played tonight that is named after the band themselves and all I could think of when listening along was that it took a page out of Kings Of Leon’s book when crafting a slower paced cracking tune.

When the band announced that the set closer was named Dazing, I was reminded of the indie gem California Daze from the title alone. Unlike the chill tune that Peace crafted, what fans get is a deceitfully energetic tune that evolves just when you think it couldn’t get any better. An amazing set closer and although the band might sing about a character not knowing much, they themselves know how to craft a catchy tune.


Both the gig and their EP were amazing to put it lightly. The band have all the makings of a true juggernaut and more often than not I’d say “time will only tell” if they’d be able to make use of this potential.

I’m not going to say that here though. Sweet White are going places and there’s no stopping that. The next big Scottish band in the making.

You can catch Sweet White tonight at the Green Room in Perth tonight with gigs at the Eagle Bar in Inverness tomorrow (17th) and the tour finale at the Harbor Lights in Peterhead on the 24th. They’ll be selling the Monet EP for £5 at their merch table alongside some black and white t-shirts. You can follow them on Twitter here.

Big love, Liam x

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ALBUM REVIEW: TURN BLUE – THE BLACK KEYS

The Black Keys aren’t exactly new to the music scene. In their career that has spanned 13 years, Dan Auerbach and Patrick Carney have released 7 albums that have gathered praise from critics and rock fans alike, most notably their 2010 release Brothers which brought the duo a lot of commercial success as they were now a grammy winning household name. Have the Ohio boys managed to continue their golden run with Turn Blue or has the success finally came to a halt?

One thing that you can rely the Black Keys delivering the goods on is production values and Turn Blue isn’t any different. Co-Producer Brian “Danger Mouse” Burton returns to lend a helping hand after assisting on El Camino and Brothers and his involvement really shows, managing to use the band’s blues rock canvas and fine stroking every detail that adds to the artistic brilliance of this album. This isn’t just a one man effort like it may have been back when the band started off as Auerbach and Carney are well regarded producers themselves with Dan assisting the likes of Lana Del Rey while Patrick has helped with lower profile bands like The Sheepdogs. You’d expect too many producers meddling with the sound to spoilt it but it does just the opposite.

After 8 albums, you’d expect Auerbach and Carney’s quality song-writing and talent to slip somewhat but you’d be wrong. The title track manages to highlight Auerbach’s falsetto voice’s finesse which prowls after Carney’s pitter patter drums which help to create a song that’s large in scale and one that needs to be listened through earphones, as advised by the duo, to really experience every fine detail that it captivates. Fever, the record’s first single, has an almost cyborg sounding background noise at the start and the rest of the track is just as interesting, showing the duo’s funkiness and an organ melody that once you’ve heard, you’ll fall in love with instantly. In Time features some ghostly vocals that are weirdly seductive sounding at the same time, as if Patrick Swayze somehow made his way onto the track. One of Turn Blue’s highlights has to be opening track Weight Of Love that has an intro so reminiscent of Pink Floyd’s Speak To Me/ Breathe that you can see the 70’s influence escaping from your earphones. At 7 minutes long, it ‘s dangerously close to overstaying it’s welcome but its absence would definitely be one that would be missed.

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Other critics, I’m looking at you NME, might complain that Turn Blue isn’t like the band’s previous outings but when an alteration of the formula sounds as funky, psychedelic and overall amazing as Black Key’s latest record is, is that really a bad thing? The duo’s golden run is still continuing and at this rate, it’ll be one to make Dorothy herself jealous.

CLASSIC REVIEW: The Strokes – Is This It

Whether you like to call it the 2000’s or the noughties,there’s no doubt that the decade was a very exciting time for music as not only were applauded albums by former well praised bands released, Radiohead’s Kid A as an example, but the new wave of bands not only surprised critics but intrigued them as well with bands like Bloc Party and Arctic Monkeys releasing some of the best albums to be released in the past 15 years.

One band that can proudly admit to being a part of this new wave are The Strokes, an American rock band that hail from New York, who came out of nowhere to not only release one of the most exciting pieces of music in the past couple of decades but also change the face of modern rock as we know it.

Throughout this album, there’s an ever present mood and atmosphere that are wonderfully brought to life by various aspects of the band, be it Casablancas’ hauntingly mesmerising voice which narrates the 11 tracks on this album, the dexterous and dazzling guitar performances by Valensi, Hammond Jnr and Fraiture or Moretti’s consistent flow that he provides on drums.

The songs on this album are of a very high standard and observe the life and times of living in a metropolis such as New York City. A song which represents this very well is the opening track Is This It? that tells of the manipulation that relationships can be a victim of with Casablanca’s voice hovering gracefully over the sound of quiet drums and a calming choir of guitars and this same theme continues over to Last Nite. This track gained the band a lot of initial hype and tells of the disappointment and aggravation that relationships can provide over time with a very upbeat tempo which will stick in your mind long after the album is finished.

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New York City Cops is clearly a not so sly hit at the city’s police department with a tongue in cheek snort at the end that adds to the album’s unique charisma. Take It Or Leave It is the concluding track and what a send off it is with Casablancas shouting over a hyperactive clash of drums and guitars that provide a brilliant album for the band’s debut.

What else can be said about an album that hasn’t been said by the hundreds of thousands of people that have listened to it? The album not only provides an insight into life in New York City but also provides the kind of character and charm that most albums can only dream of having. The album is a milestone is music and it’s no surprise that the album is regarded as one of the best albums ever made and the thing that makes me appreciate the album is even though the themes on this album were initially to give an insight of a life in a metropolis, it’s oddly relatable and explains why the album is cherished by music lovers all around the world as well as showing why this album is the greatest record produced during the noughties.