Bury Tomorrow suplex you through the fruit stand with Knife of Gold

Now, this is a take that could be cast off as cynical, but it’s likely that a lot of bands sit down to write a song that’s made for radio play. You know, the kind of song that’s probably written using Radio One’s brand guidelines. Just that one single that’s accessible enough to work its way onto radio & Spotify playlists, of course, that’s not a bad thing as it makes their music more accessible, and a more known band is a more stable band.

However, it’s fair to say that when writing new singleĀ Knife of Gold, Southampton metalcore marauders Bury Tomorrow wrote a song that’s purely made for moshpits. The sort of song that they could appear anonymously at a festival, play this song and watch an entire crowd go ape. The kind of song that you’d sprint the entire length of a field in some county just to push some people to music.

As soon as this song starts, it’s comparable to throwing a wasp’s nest into a tumble drier. Whilst lead single Black Flame felt a bit more on the lighter side to open their stall out a bit more, Knife of Gold suplexes the listener through that stall as frontman Dan Winter-Bates screams in your face. Is this a positive thing? It absolutley is. Both title trackĀ Black Flame and Knife of Gold are brilliant in different respects, with the chorus in the former being a real fist-pumper, with Knife of Gold being a fist-fighter.

One criticism of this song is as a studio track, it feels a little short. At literally just under three minutes at 2:59, it feels like it could have been fattened out a bit more, maybe a chunkier breakdown, maybe some more technical guitars, BUT, at the same time, it’s two minutes and fifty nine seconds of pure weight, so again, this song has been designed to send crowds into a frenzy in a short period of time, there’s no real dicking about from this song, it comes in, goes out and leaves you floored.

Two songs, two different sounds, but both are giving the same indiciation: get hype for Black Flame.

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