Logic can’t justify the length of ‘Bobby Tarantino II’ – or its quality

words by ryan martin (@ryanmartin182)

Bobby Tarantino IILogic’s 7th mixtape, is a self-proclaimed departure from rating 4“album Logic” where attempts a return to form for his fans that prefer his earlier work to the mainstream direction of his recent albums (woo!).

Courtesy of Rick and MortyBobby Tarantino II opens with the infamous pair debating the difference between “album Logic” and “mixtape Logic.” The main difference being lyrical subject matter. The Maryland MC’s last effort, Everybody, failed to organize the many different messages and subjects, resulting in a cluttered mess. Bobby Tarantino II counters this issue by having essentially nothing substantial to say at all.

Both Bobby Tarantino II and its predecessor exist as an outlet for Logic to put on his Bobby Tarantino alter ego and put all of his bangers and turn up songs on one project. The production, for the most part, is decent to great. Logic’s faithful producer, 6ix, has consistently provided incredible beats for Logic to hone his craft over. Songs like 44 More, Warm It Up, and Yuck demonstrate 6ix at his best.

Technicality wise, Bobby Tarantino II doesn’t stray far from the MC’s usual style of rapping. His flow and wordplay are on par with his previous work. Warm It Up is easily the best rapping performance Logic has given us since Under Pressure, as he revives his Young Sinatra alter ego from his mixtape days.

“Fuck that trap shit, this that rap shit / Give me the hand like John the Baptist / Ready to rip it, I hope in the captives / Greatest alive like I’m Cassius / I put ’em all in they caskets, they can’t see me get past it / I’m a bastard that mastered the flow / And none of y’all ready for this massacre, though / Fuck with Logic—yeah, that’s a no”

Indica Badu is an out-of-left-field weed anthem that features fellow weed-advocate, Wiz KhalifaKhalifa handles himself surprisingly well over the silky-smooth production and helps deliver one of the better cuts from the mixtape. 44 More is honestly the strongest track on the whole album. Technicality, personality and lyrically, Logic brings his A-Game with the production behind him keeping up. It’s worth noting that the beat switches are an incredible touch.

Where BT2 falls flat is when Logic begins to stray outside of his comfort zone. Everyday, the collaboration between Logic and EDM producer Marshmello, is honestly just as bad as Everyday Bro by Jake Paul. It’s a god-awful attempt to follow up his smash single 1-800-273-8255 from last year. The production is as sugary sweet as a pixy stick and Logic’s singing is so bad it practically begs you to hit the skip button. Everyday isn’t the only instance where Logic stretches his vocal chops, the opener Overnight reeks of Logic’s off-balanced singing and stinks lyrically. Logic trips up again by bluntly copying Travis Scott’s style, production and flow on Wizard of Oz. It’s one of the poorest excuses for an original rap song so far this year.

BT2 feels slightly less underwhelming than Everybody overall, but as a former Logic fan, BT2 doesn’t do much to entertain the older Logic fans other than a handful of tracks. Bobby Tarantino achieves his goal of making the “fun turn up shit” that he set out to make. That being said, it doesn’t excuse him for poor songwriting, poor singing, and poor originality spread thin throughout the mixtape. There are a handful of tracks where Logic’s hooks don’t get annoying after the 4th time and his verses are solid, but not enough to justify a 13-track-mixtape. BT2 will most certainly please his die-hard fans and those who don’t really listen to albums in full, but for all others, it’s a very run of the mill, bland, trap mixtape.

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