EP Review: How to Be Happy by Flood Manual

Words by Liam Menzies (@blnkclyr)
Photo courtesy of Dawncast

Premise: Morrissey (the young mopey kind before he became a racist “yer da” type) rating 8decides instead of going off to start one of the century’s most influential bands, he wants to branch off to start off a grunge/punk outfit. The result of this very specific pitch would be Manchester act Flood Manual, a band that runs with a simple three-word tagline: “soup with croutons“.

This comparison to The Smiths exists on two main points; they both originate from the North West and they share an unshakable vocal similarity. Louis Johnson may never reach the piercing falsetto heights of that cynical frontman, but the broody, bass-ey pipes that he shows off have a lot of resemblance throughout the band’s EP How To Be Happy.

Outside of these factors, though, Flood Manual are finding motivation elsewhere, and on paper, they really shouldn’t work. Instead of going down a more poppy route, How To Be Happy feels like a garage-rock type of affair, donning a few different costumes along the five-track running time to keep things remarkably fresh.

Empathy is a song to be commended for this, a melodic affair that feels pretty delightful with somewhat harsh guitars being pressed together with the aforementioned lovely singing to create a tasty, punky panini a la Weezer. Opener Over Me inaugurates this pattern, prancing in with a mesh of shoegazy instrumentals before chucking them off to hit into an indie rock nerve, finding a moment to chuck them back on to relish in the haziness. 

The band cites Title Fight as an influence and it’s not hard to see why, as that act have shown their ability to blend in with delicate and jarring environments: there’s a good balance of this throughout this EP, Flood Manual choosing to rest for the third as well as the penultimate track. However, it’s Citizen that can be felt coursing through most of this EP, specifically Mould, which begins with a grainy, lo-fi guitar that serves as the fragile foundations of the track.

Much like the title would imply, the major theme on here should be happiness, more so the recovery in order to reach that place where you feel some joy – that’s not the case, though, as the band talk more about the struggles that make being happy so hard. There’s a frayed and strenuous relationship on the closing eponymous track (“Only happy when you close the door“) with the aforementioned Empathy being about the loss of such faculties, containing one of the best lines out of the whole EP: “I never thought I’d see the best of me, leaving my fingertips at 17.” While this kind of subject matter would wear itself thin over the course of a full record, Flood Manual made the right call to release an EP that not only keep itself sounding crisp but what it has to say too.

As a Scottish music site, we can’t dictate what another city’s music scene is like. From the stuff that is bubbling up to the surface on a UK level, though, a large chunk of it seems to be artists wanting to replicate the sound of either The 1975 or the Madchester era. While there are similarities to some old-school heavy hitters, Flood Manual have managed to craft something that displays visible roots, but doesn’t get tempted to copy its influences, standing out from their local contemporaries. How To Be Happy may be an EP about struggles, but it’s far from a challenge to listen to.

How To Be Happy drops 5th November – you can follow Flood Manual on Facebook and Soundcloud.

EP Review: Betty & The Bass – Bad Magic Tricks, Pt.1

By Liam Menzies (@blnkclyr)rating 7

With a tagline that promotes their ability to stand aside from the average indie band, Edinburgh trio Betty & The Bass don’t seem to have got Kendrick’s memo about being humble but sometimes you need that vanity to deliver the goods. On their debut EP Bad Magic Trick, Pt.1, they’ve undergone a messy creative process of chucking a bunch of unconnected influences into a cauldron and the outcome resembles a bit of 90’s grunge, a bit of noughties rock and a hefty chunk of fun.

Some of these resemblances are more apparent than others: there’s EGD, a country song if ever you’ve heard one, that goes as far as referencing a similarly styled song by Cage The Elephant and has a similar structure with its verses gradually enforcing an inevitability. It all ends on a stretched out guitar solo that doesn’t overstay its welcome, bringing things to a natural end before naturally segwaying into the most Scottish titled track of 2017 Bruise Lit A Peach.

Opener Another Life is the real embodiment of this clusterfuck of inspiration: part Fratellis, part Edward Sharpe and The Magnetic Zeros, the song could have so easily fell into the trap of coming off as an Inbetweeners background track but through this variation in style, the alt-rock outfit come off as more…well, them.

As the EP comes to an end, we get a double-sided blade in the form of Someday: the first half is a solid affair, not something that’ll have you itching to skip but one that feels a bit weak in comparison to what came before and especially what comes next. After a mixture of chatting and tuning, the band go from Scotland to Seattle with a grungy mesh, ending everything on such an odd note as to what the band promote throughout but that doesn’t mean it’s a disappointment.

The track, and this EP for the most part, is very much the musical equivalent of eating some Quality Street, forgetting what the colours mean and just playing Russian roulette with them: you didn’t expect that zesty orange chocolate but you sure as hell ain’t complaining about it. 

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EP Review: Caelo – Visions

BY LIAM MENZIES (@BLNKCLYR)

As soon as the broody, meticulous guitars of  the eponymous track Visions makes its way down your ear canals, there’s an eerie sense of deja-vu that starts to set. With this in mind alongside the vocals, certain words drawn out and a grudge fuelled sentiment flowing from line to line, it’s hard not to draw comparisons to early 00’s grunge, most notably Blackened Sky

This is no doubt what Cape Town up and comers Caelo were aiming for. In hindsight, it makes total sense why their influences are so on the nose: born in June of last year, the alt-rock outfit’s inception was catalysed by a Biffy Clyro show that front-man Joel Bronner had attended. While many acts who find inspiration from the Scottish rock juggernauts tend to focus more on their post-Puzzle career, Caelo find solace in their grittier debut, arguably the band’s best record due to the sheer immaturity allowing a plethora of raw emotion to burst through.

https://soundcloud.com/caeloband/visions-1?in=caeloband/sets/visions-ep

The same can be said for the aforementioned opening track that shares the same names as their EP: those lone guitars that are swiftly followed up by brash drums are a quintessential trait from Biffy’s debut but when looking at this EP from a purely critical standpoint, it stands even stronger. The band’s peripheral vision isn’t blurred by fanboying, instead they decide to build upon it piece by piece – some chanting starts to layer over the sticky strings, Bronner’s pristine clean vocals floating above it all like some celestial being. A cataclysmic conclusion stretches out over a quarter of the track’s running time, shouting and balling being faintly heard over a tirade of booming drums and guitars, bringing it all to great albeit messy end.

While it may seem like Caelo are wearing rose tinted glasses, the band’s sound clicks into modern music seamlessly. Renegades couldn’t sound more like Royal Blood if it wanted to, starting with an overbearing synthesised guitar before breaking into that trademark rhythmic nature from the English duo. That being said, it’s not a straight up rip-off of their style as we get some sickeningly smooth gang vocals before the return of our digitally drenched strings start to kick into a blink or you’ll miss it chorus.

Closing tracks Catacombs could possibly be the best track of the lot, channelling a lot of what has made the renaissance of emo rock fronted by the likes of Remo Drive, Modern Baseball and co. such a treat. Layered vocals and a clear, noise rock focus paves the way for the track, its brief moments of calm giving room to breathe before letting the EP’s final moments be a cluster fuck of looping vocals and quirky playing. Caleo’s tendency to rely a little bit too much reminds me of something I can only describe as Stranger Things syndrome: a love letter to something an artist adores and while it replicates what made those things so great, it’s those moments of originality that truly make it such a treat.

8/10

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EP Review: Stop The Rain – Sinking

*DISCLAIMER: Early copy of this EP was sent by the band themselves though this has no impact on our overall verdict*

By Gregor Farquharson (@Gregoratlantic)

The surge of music talent in Scotland over the past decade has been nothing short of amazing. Bands like Biffy, Twin Atlantic and Fatherson have all had the big break they deserve, and many others have started gaining well-deserved recognition. It seems new bands are popping up from all over the wee country, and the surge shows no sign of slowing down.

Perth alt-rockers Stop The Rain are one of the many small bands eager to make a name for themselves in an ever growing scene. Having released the absolute beautiful track Home Is Where My Heart Is back in 2016, the band have released another two singles, their unique blend of guitar and synth really makes them stand from the crowd in the Scottish scene. 

The EP opens up with the massive track Your Head’s A Prison. The opener gives us an almost instant good vibe feel to it. A high pitched guitar riff followed by beautiful sounding vocals opens the track and gives us a very good idea of the sound the band wants to achieve. The unique use of synthesizer blends perfectly with the tone of the guitars and vocals. The chorus of this track is absolutely massive, brilliantly working the unique vocals of Blair Davie and Sam Steele. The tracks bridge goes straight into a section of the repeated lyrics “Just cave in feels like I want to” before leaping brilliantly into the exquisite chorus. 

This then leads us into track two of the EP, Cut The Chord. A slower paced song than the EP opener, the song still has the unique alt rock feel the band are aiming for. The buildup to the chorus is, again, a joy to the ears. As for the chorus, it is much more simplistic than that of the previous track, yet still, packs a punch that would grab any listeners almost immediate attention. The bridge of the track features some deeper lyrics, of which you’d expect from much more experienced song writers and not from a 17-year-old. The track fades out with what sounds like a drum machine, and a deep sounding synth, again uniquely using the instrument to its advantage.

Third track Side Effect opens with the same drums that ended the track prior, before bringing in the vocals, and adding guitars part by part, which eventually culminates in a huge sounding section. It slows back down, with the vocals again taking the center stage of the track. The track utilises every instrument of the band brilliantly, with a superb sounding bassline in the background throughout. The bridge of the song shows off the young band’s guitar skills, with around 30 seconds of pure guitar based work playing, to which the track completely slows down, and fades into the final track on the EP, and lead single, Sinking. 

This track opens up with a quiet riff, before quickly building up to an arena sized rock sounding opening section, an impressive feat for the young alt 5 piece. It’s easy to hear the absolute skill that has gone into the production of the album, with instruments fading in and out almost seamlessly. This is down to the superb work of Mark Morrow Audio. The song has an amazing sounding section building up to the chorus, which is very reminiscent of bands such as Vistas and Fatherson. The chorus itself is again nothing but utter musical class, using highs and lows of the vocalist’s ability to uniquely create a beautiful, unique sound. It’s easy to see that the band have written the bridge of the song in order to be played live, building bit by bit before jumping into what would be a jumpy moment for any crowd.  

The EP ends on what the band are brilliant at – using harmonies effectively, something many big bands try hard to master. If this EP is anything to go by, Stop The Rain are going to sky rocket in the Scottish music infrastructure, and certainly be playing bigger gigs than they are just now.

9/10

The Sinking EP is due to be released on all major platforms on the 15th September and is also available for pre order on the band’s website.

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EP Review: Motion – S/T

By Liam Menzies (@blnkclyr)

When it comes to the Scottish music scene, there are certain genres that seem to get more love than others. Glitzy indie rock? You’ll be struggling not to find one. Blackgaze, post-metal? Not so much. One that seems to be floating somewhat in the middle is shoegaze, something you might have expected to be more prevalent than any considering one of Scotland’s biggest bands, both commercially and critically, are The Jesus and Mary Chain.

You could probably count the number of up and coming bands in this genre on one hand, Edinburgh based three piece band Motion resting on your index finger. While the act go by the indie title, shoegaze is a vital element on all four songs of their self titled EP – right off the bat, Myths kicks things off with Paul Band’s vocals warped in the traditional style along with some gradually paced guitars. The influences may be apparent but it’s a solid start to an EP that tries and, for the most part, succeeds in being varied and entertaining. 

A point made about the band’s prior single I Can Hear You Coming was that despite it being a solid track, it didn’t do very much to help the band stand out against their contemporaries, regardless of how few there are. Queue Into The Lense, the EP’s second track that washes its vocals of their wishy washy tinge to allow Band to sing about what can be described as a shot at the vain pop culture we experience.

Lines about giving all you got to keep them, presumably higher ups and the media, smiling and glasses full of tears give a real image of the sheer emotional stress that keeping up appearances, regardless if you’re a celebrity or not, can cause. It’s a class example of how Motion are using this rich tapestry of sounds as a platform for something more interesting as opposed to making it the sole attraction, allowing some analytical and descriptive lines akin to the likes of Morrissey.

Closing track Everything helps the EP to leave a sweet taste in your mouth. Succeeding Who, not a weak song by any means but one that keeps a loose grip on you throughout, Everything is arguably the best written track Motion have came out with thus far, moving along at a solid pace but doing enough instrumentally that you never feel your attention floating anywhere that the band don’t want it do.

There’s a near minute long clash of drums and guitars as the conclusion draws near, the band exerting all remaining energy. Motion may have started off with a light fizzle but much like the finale of their debut EP, the band show they’re more than capable of going out with a bang.

7/10


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EP Review: Atlas Run – Depths

By Liam Menzies (@blnkclyr

Burying their way into your skin without a moment’s hesitation with an infectious song is a feat many bands aspire to but very few manage to achieve. That’s not to say that acts who fail to do so are bad, more that the challenge of getting someone to put a song of yours on loop is increasingly more difficult in the digital age, especially when you’re a small act who have only recently just started having a stab at the whole “making music” thing.

So when first chucking Atlas Run‘s debut EP Depths on for a spin, you might find yourself happily surprised by how quickly you’ll find yourself listening to opening single Chasing The Storm on repeat – there’s that catchy pop appeal meshed with an indie rock sound not unlike something Foals would conduct on Total Life Forever, an album that bears an uncanny resemblance to that of Depths with its aquatic theme. The hook is simple and effective, allowing listeners both old and new to find themselves intrigued by twangy Scottish vocals followed up by some seductive, sonic guitars in the succeeding verses. It’s very much the track that any band would sell their soul to bash out at live shows and Atlas Run make a smart move by making this the first taste from the EP.

Starting off a record with your strongest track, whether it be an extended play or full length release, can be seen as shooting as yourself in the foot and while this may hold true even with Depths, it doesn’t mean that what comes after is sub-par by any stretch. Open Water faces the task of following up this catchy opening track and does a fairly solid job of it with synths packing this almost Hot Fuss-esque sound, making you wonder if the band had knicked a Nord Lead 2X from Brandon Flowers and co. The comparison between drinking and drowning isn’t inherently original but the way the sound submerges the listener gives it that extra layer, leading you to believe that the band are at the very least observant with their work.

Image may contain: 4 people, people standing and outdoor

Rose may initially fool you at first with what sounds like an acoustic ballad, a cliche too many acts are still falling into, but it eventually metamorphoses into this decent wee love song with some pounding backing instrumentals that help the band to regain the energy and force that make them nice to listen to. Then there’s In My Defence which is probably the closest the band comes to channelling an alt-rock sound with washed out guitars and an almost glitchy production providing a taste of something different though it never gets to spread its wings.

With all said and done, Atlas Run‘s challenge of standing out in a genre that is so popular, especially in the Scottish music scene, is certainly a gargantuan one. Even if it seems that they haven’t completed it perfectly, they sure as hell show the makings of a band who aren’t just following the footsteps of those before them – they’re just as ready to start their own path on the sand, no matter the difficulty.

6.5/10


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EP Review: Broad-Shouldered Baby – I Must Be Tired

By Liam Menzies (@blnkclyr

It would probably surprise you to hear that despite the abundance of music projects available on the internet, only a hand few seem to ever reference this in some shape or form. What wouldn’t surprise you is that out of those artists that have, Tom Fraser can raise his hand and say he has. To those that know Fraser, or happen to follow him on his twitter, his wit and humour is one of the first features of his that will pop to mind: after all, we’re talking about the man whose twitter name is an infusion of a Channel 4 presenting duo and the person responsible for the death of Jesus Christ.

Fraser is not a one trick pony though, currently playing in Codist as a drummer and backing vocalist, two contributions that helped their debut LP Nuclear Family to be one of the best records of last year. Now the spotlight is finally upon him as he has a stab at the big bad music world with his project Broad-Shouldered Boy, dropping the first EP under this moniker I Must Be Tired (see, that intro wasn’t a waste after all!). 

While it could be easy to let the pressure topple Fraser over, his solo efforts stand firmly on their own, embedding his own unique quirkiness into the staple bedroom pop/rock template that makes for one of the most refreshing listens of the year so far. An essential example of this would be the second track Trunk, a song that focuses more on a giant grey elephant than the boot of a car. Stomping along at a steady pace with its bellowing drums, Fraser’s silky vocals adorned with a Scottish tinge lead as he sings about insecurities and paranoia, outright mentioning the EP’s title to touch upon the exhaustion these feelings have caused.

It reaches its peak as Trunk approaches its climax, Fraser naturally warping his voice into this deep narration to detail this metaphor for this anxiety (The elephant is in the room, has its trunk around my neck), a moment that highlights Fraser’s knack for making emotions that countless artists talk about into something truly special.

It really is Fraser’s vocals and lyrics that make I Must Be Tired such an essential listen though that’s not to say the instrumentals are drab or dull by any means. Following on from the aforementioned track featuring a large grey mammal, Cake is a far slower number that features layer upon layer though is juxtaposingly sombre in tone, reaching a turbulent conclusion which includes a spine chilling piano feature alongside a timid projection of Fraser’s vocals. This mixing pot of wit, lyricism and an undeniable talent helps Broad Shouldered Boy to stand out in a scene that feels over-saturated quite frequently. 

Finishing off with that staple acoustic number, there’s a real feeling of The Hotelier with the running inclusion of a simplistic lyric and the different sound it evokes as seen on Goodness (I see the moon, the moon sees me) . Broad Shouldered Boy is a dangerous project due to it traversing the fine line of bedroom pop, a genre that is traditionally very safe: using that appealing sound and infusing it with many of the traits Fraser embodies, I Must Be Tired comes off as one of 2017’s strongest EPs. The future is looking bright for Fraser’s venture though he could do with a rest – he must be tired. 

8.5/10


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EP Review: Soggy – S/T

BY LIAM MENZIES (@BLINKCLYRO)

There’s a certain therapeutic advantage that comes from writing music. While you may expect to hear this from an amateur musician (looking at you Jez) or a stoner (looking at you Jez), there’s actual evidence to support this notion: research puts it down to it being a sort of cathartic action that allows an artist to come to terms with emotions, expanding the toolbox of the person in question.

It’s no real surprise, then, to hear bands such as Soggy champion the curative benefits of music with emotion being the core factor of what they do, using the deepest, darkest parts of their depression to create their art. The day to day struggles that the Texas rockers explore here may not be groundbreaking but the way in which they execute them certainly allow the band to shine as another example in emo rock’s rejuvenation.

This is clear from, quite literally, the get go as introductory track Small Town gets things underway with a mighty, punky kick: already, it’s clear to see that Soggy wear both their idols and emotions on their sleeves with a clear Joyce Manor influence radiating from every orifice of this track’s angsty little body. In addition to this, there’s no way of shaking the similarities to Remo Drive, another new act who are championing in a new age of angsty punk with a dashing of emo. There’s the classic trait of worrying about being stuck in, you guess it, a small town but the extra layers crafted by the protagonist’s existentialism and constant fear save it from being just another rehash of a pop punk trope that has got very tedious.

As it continues, Soggy start to get more comfortable with the listener, albeit not for very long. Succeeding track Radicus Finch is evidence enough of this, showing a very varied form of instrumentals: one minute, the band become very laid back and chill before breaking into this hectic cataclysm and it all gives way for some unexpected, one-off stylings (just try to shake off those very sweet blips of percussion that hark back to The Front Bottoms‘ debut). While it may seem like the sound is what drives this track but it’s really the performance of all the members is what makes it a stand out on the EP. A notable highlight has to be, once again, lead vocalist Alexi’s vocals, wonderfully carrying a messy breakdown about inadequacy and change though Scott on guitar does manage to steal the show at the tail end of the song, showing the band is more the sum of their parts than a one man show.

This isn’t to imply that Soggy iron out all the flaw on this release: one notable complaint has to be the length of certain tracks though unlike their counterparts, the band tends to drag songs on too long rather than cut them short. While they’re pleasant to listen to, sometimes tracks tend to be border on filler which no bombastic breakdown can help fix. Thankfully, instances like this are very few and far between and 90% of the time, Soggy hit the mark with their own rendition of emo-punk goodness. Full of identity and progress, Soggy manage to mature via their use of their music as an outlet to let out all angst and rage. With their debut EP cementing the potential the band hold,  they aren’t set to outstay their welcome anytime soon.

8/10


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EP REVIEW: FOSTER THE PEOPLE – III

By Will Sexton (@willshesleeps)

In 2017, seeing the announcement that Foster The People had released new music was a surprise to say the least. Their songs featured heavily in the early 2010’s following the success of their debut, especially in the sport-gaming scene with the likes of FIFA and SSX matching up perfectly with their zesty pop-indie rock tunes. The gorgeous blend of indie-rock and luscious pop make this band something that you might have heard before, attempted by someone else, but not executed quite as successfully. The EP feature 3 songs from their upcoming untitled album that will be released in the summer.

The new singles Pay The Man, Doing It For The Money and S.H.C are fabulous additions to the already impressive collection of music. The sound has evolved but not changed enough for it to be completely different. Many have suspected that a few of these songs would be influenced by the inauguration of a certain American President as this band are heavy supporters of Bernie Sanders in the run-up to the election.


Pay The Man opens with a synth-brass section that almost takes a page out of Run The Jewels book and the song evolves to sort of a sing-rap song about ‘the system’ and ‘the man’ being an image of power that controls us all. The mention of ‘the man’ has been approached a lot in the styles of music like rock and punk music so it’s interesting to see it approached in indie-pop, but this band being very politically involved over the last 2 years I’m not surprised. It’s a strong opening to the EP, no doubt setting the tone for the album.

8/10


Doing It For The Money sees Foster The People use a new style of drums influenced by trap music and the chorus of this song being very big spacey and anthem-like. Contrary to the album title, the idea of this song is that they AREN’T doing it for the money. They’re still making music and proving themselves saying “We are still here”. This song also feels like a call out to all people to stand up for what you believe in and don’t be afraid to speak your mind. Very empowering and the gorgeous mixing and instrumentation on the track really help it. The way the band changes into the bridge from the second chorus is very reminiscent of their two other albums, solidifying that they hadn’t lost their way in experimenting.

8/10


S.H.C (Secret Hearts Club) brings the indie guitar back and as soon as this song starts up, you’ll be taken aback by a bombardment of nostalgia. This song sees Mark Foster expressing about how the world is in a dark place right now but he wants to “live his life again” and it almost seems as if he is saying that he can live his life again through his music. Mark stated this when the EP was released: “One of my favorite things about music is that it’s unifying. We wrote these songs to reflect joy in a time where people have needed it more than ever and we thought it was a good time to share them with you.” which further proves this point. 

9/10


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LOOKING BACK AT…EVERYONE THAT DRAGGED YOU HERE by REAL FRIENDS

By Liam Menzies (@blinkclyro)

Real Friends are a pop punk band from Chicago which they will never allow you to forget during their breakout EP. Exhibit A: Anchor Down, the sophomore track on Everyone That Dragged You Here which starts off with “I don’t really think I’m ready for another Chicago winter“, a simple lyric that may lead you to believe that the act wasn’t anything to get bothered about back in 2012, regardless if they’ve now accumulated a solid fanbase as well as two studio records. However, to call them off as just another sappy pop punk band would be doing both Real Friends and yourself a huge disservice. 

Let’s go back to the aforementioned Anchor Down which, instrumentally, isn’t breaking any boundaries: driving guitars start to pulsate right before a climactic chorus with the trademark chugging emo rock chords playing a dominant role throughout the track. It does the job right but all of this has become stale considering the abundance of bands who have since utilised these instrumental staples. One thing has managed to stand the test of times, though. Lyrics are where Real Friends stand out, emerging from their suburban homes as pop punk poets with a great deal of transparency. Anchor Down is unrelentingly honest and transparent with “anchor down your feet, say fuck the past and everyone that dragged you here” being a particular highlight of the track. Even frontman Dan Lambton even admits on the band’s blog is a bit on the mean side, ‘appreciation’s something you lost in the dirt that’s on your hands and knees‘, but the brutal honesty manages to be delivered without dipping its toes into any sexist waters.

That’s not to say that the act covered any subjects that hadn’t already been done to death in the genre before as ex-girlfriends and feeling like the world is against you is the bread and butter of pop punk). Rather than finding new topics, it’s the way that they manage to explore them that helps Everyone That Dragged You Here to not feel like a relic of a time long forgotten.

Image result for real friends 2012

Opening track Floorboards is often regarded as the band’s best track and for good reason: it begins with such unfiltered energy that you’d be forgiven for not realising that the track covers one of the lowest points in Lambton’s life. The song uses the word “you” once but still manages to deliver direct post-break up feelings with a lot of original intent, specifically the line about “being jealous of the trees next to my neighbour’s garage” managing to evoke the feelings of being unable to change and the sorrow this brings. This kind of lyricism has since became expected of the band and, for the most part, Real Friends have made good on their promise of continuing this insightfulness. 

Does Everyone That Dragged You Here fall into some cliche potholes? Of course, it does. You could make a drinking game out of the number of times Lambton refers to his bony knees and Real Friends aren’t the first band to hark back to listening to American Football. “If you think the band is some revolutionary thing, that’s very flattering, but we don’t try to go out and say we are the new Fall Out Boy or we’re the next Wonder Years” said Lambton in an interview with Rock Sound prior to the release of their debut studio album. Real Friends and Everyone… stand out by, well, not trying to stand out at all. While they may hark to cheesier times of pop punk, their ambiguous lines that deliver a great deal of honesty manages to show the genre ain’t the same rotting corpse from the 90’s.


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