Album Review: iridescence by Brockhampton

words fae owen yule (@OwenYule)

During the recording process of iridescence, BROCKHAMPTON talisman Kevin Abstract rating 8noted that the group felt like they were back in their Saturation I days, yet, so much has changed. No longer are the group creating their music from a home studio in California; no longer are the group broadcasting out with the eye of the music world; no longer are the group working as independent artists; perhaps most significant of all, no longer are the group operating as an 18-man collective.

It goes without question then that iridescence marks a substantial transition in the boy band’s career and so, it comes as no surprise that said changes are reflected in the content of the music. In spite of all success and triumph that BROCKHAMPTON have earned since the release of SATURATION I, Iridescence relays feelings of anger at the world: soundscapes of aggression are facilitated by bombastic drums that often play in syncopation and at varied tempos, giving the LP an intense and abrasive quality. This aggression is perhaps at its most resounding on BERLIN, where each bass note thumps like an uppercut to the chin with the support and reinforcement of growling muscle cars. Nonetheless, this ferocity is only fully actualised by the vocal performances of the group, specifically, Merlyn and Joba who both give their best performances for Brockhampton to date. On WHERE THE CASH AT, Merlyn gives a performance with a cadence that accentuates the rapacious desire evident in the track title, while Joba’s rapping on J’OUVERT escalates in volume perpetually through the verse before culminating in maniacal screams.

Although the album frequently indulges in forceful noise, it succeeds in interpolating feelings of vulnerability and sweet balladry singing. This is a juxtaposition which at this point is well refined by the boyband. One moment they are seething and the next, romantic. The contrast is not only a testament to the myriad of talent in the group but also their versatility.

Halfway through the album DISTRICT evolves in to a slow finger-picked sprawl of melody so dreamy that we almost forget the track was once grimy and whiplash-inducing with its bass; momentarily before transitioning in to the short and soothing THUG LIFE, the album opens with a track that utilises a power drill sound effect to reinforce its abrasive aesthetic; SAN MARCOS marks one of the boybands most melodic and soulful tracks in their discography as it helps bring the album to a close in its latter stages. This contrast in tones is reflective of the group’s measurement in extremes. When it comes to their ideology there is no half-stepping and emotions all across the spectrum are fleshed out and brought to fruition wether it’s positivity or turmoil.

But if there’s a singular resounding force that comes through the lyrical qualities of iridescence, it’s honesty. As a rapper, Abstract works in a similar vein to Kanye West – a rapper that he has openly spoken off with ardour – in that his use of complex wordplay and flows are negligible or even non-existent. Instead, his appeal is derived from the honesty and heart in his lyrics that throughout this album continue to explore his inner conflict in addition to attempts to normalise homosexuality within hip-hop culture. However, in terms of rapping procedure, Dom McLennan continues to shine as the groups most poetic. On this LP he reaffirms his status as the groups most lyrical member with a plethora of verses throughout the album that showcases his technical skill. But again, in spite of all complexity, his raps come from a visceral place and never come across as masturbatory. On the albums closer Fabric, Dom tells us that he ponders how he can “change the world that I move through” and with such poignant explorations of mental health issues throughout the album, it’s hard to argue with the legitimacy of his sentiment.

The album hits are at its most moving in its latter stages, most notably with the long-awaited CDQ of the previously live performed,  TONYA. It is a track that is somber yet grandiose, it is a dissection into the psyche of the group, a step into the spiraling staircase of wallow and self-doubt, a summation of the hurt and anguish weighing on BROCKHAMPTON. With that being said, however, the album closes with FABRIC echoing the mantra that “these are the best days of our lives” and maybe that’s what Abstract referred to when he called back to the Saturation I days. That feelings of enthusiasm and hope are not only alive but reminiscent of those during the formation of the group’s breakout album. That feeling of hope and enthusiasm are here for the boybands future… a future that we can’t wait to see unfold.

 

Our 20 Most Anticipated Albums of 2018

words and header by liam menzies (@blnkclyr) unless specified

Remember how phenomenal that one song you heard from 2017 was? That album that you couldn’t stop yourself from spinning as soon as it had reached the end of its vinyl? At this point in the year, it can be all too easy to look back with rose-tinted glasses at the year that has passed and while it was great, it would be idiotic of us to ignore what the next 12 months have in store for us. We may very well miss out on some of your hotly anticipated ones, whether that be the album being hidden at the time of writing or sheer ignorance, but the team has put their heads together to come up with this list of the records we can’t wait to get into our ears…


Black Foxxes – Reoli

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Why: Another band that you REALLY should be listening to, Devonshire trio Black Foxxes will be releasing Reoli on March 16th. Their debut album, I’m Not Well, came out in 2016 to high praise, and whilst the themes in the album, including depression, anxiety & frontman Mark Holley’s struggle with Crohn’s disease are a heavy drink of water, the album is incredibly listenable and a must have on anyone’s playlist. Whilst only one song has broken cover from this album, the smart gambler would put a few chips on this being a dark horse in the album of the year contest. – oliver butler (@notoliverbutler)

When: 16th March 2018.


Blood Orange – LP4

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Why: Having released one of 2016’s most underrated records Freetown Sound, Dev Hynes is set to follow it up with his fourth full-length album this year. It seems set to be a challenging, introspective listen if his 2017 interview is anything to go by: “A lot of the new songs on the new album deal with growing up and childhood in England [..] looking at the country that made me”. Admitting that it’ll be a little dark in the same piece, Blood Orange LP4 is set to be an important listen.

Proof: Image above as well as this DIY article.


Brockhampton – Team Effort

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WhyAfter the, let’s be honest, far better than it had any right to be SATURATION trilogy, you’d be forgiven for being a bit burned out on the best boy band since One Direction. But it just seems that that isn’t the case at all. Now free from any continuity restrictions that the Saturation trilogy enforced them to, this next album will hopefully see even more innovation and surprises from BROCKHAMPTON. ethan woodford (@human_dis4ster) & jake cordiner (@jjjjaketh)

Proof: This tweet right here from the boys themselves.


Car Seat Headrest – Twin Fantasy

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Why: Before you rush into the comments to tell us that Twin Fantasy was released in 2011 – we know, you’re not special for knowing that. The reason this Car Seat Headrest album is included on our list is down to Will Toledo mistakenly announcing via a now taken down listing that a re-release will be happening. However, as opposed to the traditional meaning, Toledo has the benefit of a bigger budget, a full band in fine form, and endless time to tinker, meaning what we’ll get seven years later will be the album he really wanted to make.

When: Feb 16th.


Codist – LP2

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Why: Sleep? Who needs it?! The Codist boys certainly don’t seem to need any as they’re set to drop the follow up to their 2016 debut Nuclear Family (which was pretty fucking good). Having dropped an EP last year on the newly founded LP Records label, we’re psyched to see what this Glasgow rock outfit have tucked away for us.

When: This lil video right here.


Courtney Barnett – LP3

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Why: After a successful collaboration with Kurt Vile on Lotta Sea Lice, fans of Courtney Barnett are eager to see what the up and coming Australian artist is going to ramble about on a new LP. Sometimes I Sit And Think, and Sometimes I Just Sit was one of the best albums of 2015 due to its undeniable charm and with some well-earned experience from subsequent ventures, we’re excited to see what changes she’ll be making on this record.

Proof: Barnett chatted to Zane Lowe about the new album on his beats1 station.


Danny Brown – LP5

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Why: If the fact that this Detroit rapper’s last album Atrocity Exhibition was our 2016 Album Of The Year isn’t enough to get you pumped up then what’s wrong with you? Danny Brown crafted one of the most exciting and wholly original hip-hop albums of the century alongside Paul White and with this new album set to be “produced by one producer, who’s legendary in hip-hop“, we can’t wait to see what path Danny leads us on.

Proof: Brown admitted on Twitter that he’s working on a currently untitled new album.


Dorothy – 28 Days in The Valley

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Why: Dorothy are probably the best band you’ve never heard of. Or, if you’ve heard of them, one of the best new bands on your radar. Signed to Jay-Z’s Roc Nation label, the bluesy brawlers will be releasing 28 Days in the Valley this year, their follow up to 2016’s ROCKISDEAD. Mixing heavy, bluesy rock with frontwoman Dorothy Martin’s swelling vocals, Dorothy have a crunching modern sound that’s full of classic influences. – oliver butler (@notoliverbutler)

Proof: The band admitted the album is set to drop in early 2018.


Drenge – LP3

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Why: Hopefully set to return after almost a 3-year absence, Sheffield trio Drenge will look to return with a vengeance. Looking to combine the best aspects from their different but both excellent albums so far, LP 3 will no doubt be well worth the wait. – ethan woodford (@human_dis4ster)

Proof: It exists (unless the guys were in an Edgar Wright mood).


Gorillaz – LP5

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Why: While the critical reception to the band’s much-anticipated comeback album Humanz wasn’t what anyone was hoping for, that doesn’t mean we aren’t any less excited for what’s to come. Not much is known about it at the moment but if it’s a Gorillaz record, expect it to be grandiose, entertaining and ignite a lot of discussions.

When: The group’s Jamie Hewlett admitted the album’s existence.


Grimes – LP5

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Why: Explaining in an Instagram video she’s been “in the studio every day trying to legit make something you’ve never heard before”, Canadian artist Claire Boucher has consistently impressed since her 2010 debut and her upcoming LP seems to be no different. With a focus on being fresh and exciting, Art Angels managed to win Grimes a lot of new fans and whatever she has next will, regardless of quality, keep them as well as old enthusiasts surprised.

Proof: This article right here.


Injury Reserve – LP2

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Why: After impressing everyone with their debut studio album Floss and further keeping that smile on our faces with last year’s Drive It Like It’s Stolen EP, this zany and fresh hip-hop outfit seem set to keep the golden streak running with a follow up LP. “we’re about to go hole up in a cabin in northern Arizona and simultaneously put together the best tour of 2018 and the best album of our career so far” is what Parker Corey said recently on his Twitter so with their confidence so high, it’s appropriate to get suitably hyped for LP2.

Proof: New full-length album confirmed here😉


Interpol – LP6

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Why: Marking 15 years since their landmark debut Turn On The Bright Lights, Interpol have performed the album in its entirety across a series of sold-out shows this year. Such a momentous occasion felt like the perfect time to wheel out some new material, which is precisely what happened at London’s Alexandra Palace. Included in the encore was Real Life, the first taste of what to expect from their follow up to El Pintor – a mouth-watering prospect as we wait to see what direction their post-Carlos D era takes them in. kieran cannon (@kiercannon)

Proof: The aforementioned performances of new material last year.


Justin Timberlake – Man Of The Woods

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Why: It might be cool to hate on chart music but if there’s an artist who manages to make even the biggest of bucket hat wearing indie lads bop to a pop tune, it’s probably gonna be Justin Timberlake. With this pretense, you might expect another slick listen but from what has been teased so far, expect something more akin to Bon Iver than anything else – that might repulse some but for people like ourselves who wish to see big stars push themselves in interesting directions, we’re utterly intrigued to see what Man Of The Woods has to show.

When: Feb 2nd.


Kanye West – Turbo Grafx 16

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Why: When you have the late, great Lou Reed praising you then you must be doing something right and the ever egotistical Kanye West looks set to continue his golden run with his new gaming inspired record Turbo Grafx 16. With the record set to feature sampling from the likes of No More Heroes and Super Mario Galaxy in addition to hosting appearances from the likes of Kendrick Lamar, Chance The Rapper and Young Thug, Kanye may be set to deliver the oddest record of 2018.

Proof: gBzFazu.png


Phil Campbell & The Bastard Sons – Age of Absurdity 

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Why: After hitting the road playing a mix of originals and covers, plus a six-track EP in 2016, Phil Campbell and his band of bastardy men are ready to release their first full-length album; Age of Absurdity. So far, this band has proven that the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree, as Phil’s sons Todd, Tyla & Dane are all incredibly talented musicians in their own right. – oliver butler (@notoliverbutler)

When: January 26th.


Screaming Females – All At Once 

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Why: A band we weren’t aware of up until a recent Spotify recommendation, Screaming Females packs in one of the best rock/punk vocalists in the form of Marissa Paternoster who is just on the mic as she is on the guitar. First cut off All At Once, titled Glass House, is anthemic and builds up to a climax that blurs the line between shaky and untenable: if that’s anything to go by then this LP will prove to be one of 2018’s best rock albums.

When: Feb 23rd


Simon Neil – ZZC

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Why: Big Si dropped a track on Christmas Day, so that’s good enough for me to believe his long-teased solo effort is finally almost here. The aforementioned track, titled The Myth, is a 7 and a half minute long instrumental that goes from orchestral to mathy as fuck rock at the drop of a hat. It’s really, REALLY good, and if it’s an indication of the direction of rest of the album, it sounds like the untethered, mental Simon Neil that die-hard Biffy Clyro fans have been pining for is back, and back with a vengeance. – jake cordiner (@jjjjaketh)

Proof: Si has been teasing this for years now and with The Myth being the opening track, this surely means it’s sooner rather than later for his solo effort.


Vampire Weekend – LP4

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Why: While the band members themselves certainly haven’t been slacking, whether that be contributing to anime or making their own solo album, it’s been a long ass time since Vampire Weekend last blessed us with some new music – half a decade to be exact. With the likes of Kanye West being cited as an inspiration for the yet untitled fourth LP, it’s hard not to be intrigued by what the New York lads have in store for us.

Proof: This juicy lil interview with Ezra Koenig.


The Xcerts – Hold On To Your Heart

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Why: The three singles already released from this album are some of the band’s best work to date and, from what we heard on their live tour in October, the other tunes are certainly going to be a treat as well. gregor farquharson (@grgratlntc)

When: 19th January.

 

Top 40 Albums of 2017

It was a reoccurring bit last year to mention how horrible the past 12 months had been, what with the rise of Trump, Brexit, and other horrible tragedies, and it wouldn’t be amiss to make the same critique about 2017: in a year where racism has been rifer than ever, or maybe just more in our face, along with the exposure of horrible abusers in some of the highest walks of life, the news has been a catalyst for our misery. 

Thankfully on the flip side of the coin, a lot of amazing art has been the product of this horribleness and has given many an outlet to process this misery, or maybe escape it altogether. We’ve been lucky enough to cover the best of it and while there’s been a lot of good, we sadly had to cut it down to a select few; well, 40 to be exact.

Over the course of the next however-long-it-takes-you-to-read-this, we’ll be doing our best to justify each and every record’s place on this list which originally clocked in at over 100 albums. In addition, we’ll have some special guests nominated for AOTY to give us their favourite record(s) of the year.

So strap yourself in, grab your beverage of choice, and sink your teeth into this big ol’ boy…

40. Bravado
by Kirin J. Callinan
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Chances are if you listened to Bravado this year, it was no doubt down to the Best Music Meme of 2017™ that was Jimmy Barnes iconic scream on Big Enough and while that was how most of the team came across this album, it was so much more than just a meme vessel.

The real catalyst for Bravado‘s appeal comes down to Kirin J. Callinan‘s ability to take the piss out of himself (maybe quite literally if the album is anything to go by) as well as others: S.A.D is a wonderful jab at ambiguous-but-totally-not-ambiguous radio hits about drugs while also being a delightful party tune with apt production and vocal warping. Following up this is Down 2 Hang, a song that takes the expression to chill a bit too literally with some black humour about nooses and resembling some Louvre art, showcasing the up and comer’s ability to captivate and entertain.

Don’t get us wrong: Big Enough is a beautiful over the top marvel with a clusterfuck of influences and perfect features from Alex Cameron and the aforementioned Barnes but to play Callinan‘s LP off as solely that would be a cardinal sin. – Liam Menzies (@blnkclyr)

SPOTIFY | BUY

39. Arca
by Arca
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If you’ve been smart enough to listen to Arca‘s self-titled effort before reading this, the production of it will not surprise you: regularly visiting and hanging out by the cemetery near his London flat, the young Venezuelan artist found inspiration in the surrounding environments, notably the decomposing trees thatare much more beautiful than any other kind of texture.

If you haven’t dived into this album then this information will be starkly clear as soon as it starts: Piel is an ever-expanding landscape, spine-chilling yet strangely gorgeous vocals lightly piercing your ears, regardless of your ability to speak Spanish, while the backing instrumentals start to tune themselves in, becoming borderline intimidating as the song reaches its end. 

Even when Arca touches into his party animal side, there’s a still darkness dwelling inside, notably on Desafio with echoing, warped vocals booming over as lines such as “there’s an abyss inside me” bounce off his self-imposed, claustrophobic walls. It shouldn’t be a surprise that a producer behind artists like Kanye West would be able to deliver an album like this, but it sure as hell is eerie how it’s presented. – LM

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38. Melancholia Hymns
by Arcane Roots
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A start to finish epic, Arcane Roots‘ latest release has a lot of touches that help to make it one of the most magical releases of the year. Melancholia Hymns is an amazing atmospheric marvel that plays on a lot of synth sounds yet still pulls through with a heavy and math-rock influence.

The harsh, attacking songs like Everything (All at Once), with Andrew Groves soaring vocals over the top of a battleground of instruments, really punches you a new one. What makes the song so impressive is how it follows up Fireflies which is undoubtedly the calmest of the bunch, truly displaying the variety this band can offer.

Technically and production wise this album is tight as it’s got your classic rock band instruments but with that technological twist with industrial drums and drum machine clicks. Groves learned the piano epically to add a new dimension to the rock outfit’s music which you can hear in the dreamier and more synth-heavy sound they found while discovering this album. All of this ends up resulting in it being the perfect culmination of the act so far with some much-welcomed twists. – Will Sexton (@willshesleeps)

FULL REVIEW HERE

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37. Forever
by Code Orange
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It’s often said that you shouldn’t judge a book by its cover but when it comes to Code Orange‘s third studio album Forever, you definitely should: with it being nearly solely black and white bar the red blood gushing from the mouth, it evokes a sense of Sin City-esque visceral-ness.

The album definitely follows through with this promise on nearly every front: there are the usual roars and harsh vocal deliveries that fans of metalcore will be used to and fond of but the way they mesh with some borderline heavy alt-rock instrumentals makes it refreshing to those familiar and accessible for those wanting to dip their toes in.

Tracks like Bleeding In The Blur are undeniably catchy while having some edge to it while something like Real is a straight up colossus that leaves no doubts in your mind how relentless this Pensylvania act are willing to go. Regardless of your regular genre foray, the work Code Orange provide and show off on their comeback LP. – LM

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36. Any Joy
by Pronto Mama
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A Scottish act well worth smothering in love, Pronto Mama did a very good job at not only filling the Bombay Bicycle Club hole left in our hearts but somehow surpassing this comparison, becoming a wholly unique band in their own right and a force to be reckoned with.

On Any Joy, we see the indie rock label have every fiber of its being stretched: yes, they may be on a small label, shoutout to Electric Honey, with some unmistakable rock elements to them but the sound this Glasgow act go for is something else. This is best summed up by the single Arabesque which goes about some familiar topics such as relationships but goes around it in an incredibly enjoyable way, what with its layered performances lead by the incredibly strong, Glaswegian pipes from Marc Rooney. 

There’s an abundance of highlights, a particular favourite being Bottom Feeder that packs in some visceral lyrics, and for a band to be capable of something like this so early on, it’s enough to make even someone with a stone cold heart excited. – LM

Also…

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FULL REVIEW HERE

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35. Eternity In Your Arms
by Creeper
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Regarded by many as the most exciting debut album of 2017, goth punks Creeper staked their claim for album of the year early on. Defined as “horror punk“, but taking cues from glam rock, post-hardcore and good old-fashioned punk, Eternity, In Your Arms is a rip-roaring ride from start to finish with the soft piano of Black Rain leading you in, to the bombastic, Queen-esque piano of I Choose To Live.

The meat (or meat-free alternative) and potatoes of any album are the vocals, and the combination of Will Gould and Hannah Greenwood is sublime, with the latter taking a solo turn on the soulful Crickets. Best just to stick this album on and let it consume you, but the real highlights are Black Rain, Poison Pens, Misery, Crickets, I Choose to Live and Suzanne. Easily one of the best albums of 2017, Creeper won’t be leaving your conscience any time soon. – Oliver Butler (@notoliverbutler)

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34. After Laughter
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Paramore has somehow remained at the forefront of pop punk since 2005. But 12 years and two band members later, the Tennessee band finally have a new sound. After Laughter shakes off the act’s angsty teenage image and replaces it with something simple but undeniably refreshing. The album is unbelievably sunny, a continuous loop of chirpy 80’s inspired bangers as Hayley William’s, forever impressive, vocals continue to look at sadness and anger but from a more grown-up perspective.

Most of the songs are upbeat but a calm sense of relief and acceptance is consistent throughout. After Laughter feels like the album Paramore have been wanting to make for years. It’s vibrant, fun and bold but still moody enough to appeal to their original fan base. Like their audience, Paramore have grown up.

This album shows that despite change to their sound and their line-up, Paramore remain a go to band for when you just need to feel something, no matter if that is happiness, sadness or anything in-between. – Isabella McHardy (@isabellamchardy)

FULL REVIEW HERE

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33. Orc
by Oh Sees
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The newest release from Oh Sees (formerly ‘Thee Oh Sees’) titled Orc shows that John Dwyer and his new-look lineup have no intentions of slowing down. After 20 years of great albums, the band has remained both high energy and consistent with their releases. Whilst others look to slow down, John Dwyer throttles his guitar and ramps up the intensity on his newest record.

The California garage rockers have produced one of the most hectically brilliant psychedelic albums of the year. In perfect harmony, the band proceeds to blow minds with their psychedelic jams and continue to impress with their ever-evolving sound. Animated Violence, Nite Expo, and The Static God stand out as album highlights amongst a great track listing, starting the album off with a bang.

With recent years producing perhaps some of the bands best work, it is clear that Oh Sees are royalty in the garage and psych community. With the band changing name, appearance, and sound, it is fair to assume that John Dwyer is still focussed on pushing the band to their limit and consistently releasing great records. Hopefully, this great streak continues into 2018, following the footsteps of A Weird Exists and Orc. – Ewan Blacklaw (@ewanblacklaw)

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32. Full Day, Cool Times
by MC Almond Milk
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Scottish hip-hop may sound like a funny concept to some but considering the meteoric rise of Young Fathers, the arrival of MC Almond Milk and his place on this list wasn’t so much a question of if, rather when.

You may assume that a Scottish rapper would be more akin to those diss tracks everyone would share via Bluetooth than anything else but you’d be wrong; tracks like 1995 go to show just how mature James Scott’s songs really are as he reminisces on days gone by with the track starting to reach an anxiety-inducing climax as he dwells on current issues. Of course, this doesn’t mean it’s all serious all the time with Scott managing to hit out with some comedic lines and even an upbeat belter in the form of Black Coffee.

With some of the best production to be heard in this genre all year, a particular highlight being on Wet Wednesday Pt. 2 with its jagged crackly guitar and solid keys, Full Day, Cool Times is as close to a claustrophobic listen as you’ll get in 2017. – LM

FULL REVIEW HERE

BUY

Also…

2017-12-22

31. You Are We
by While She Sleeps

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An incredibly successful album from one of the most exciting bands in metal, While She Sleeps really burst back onto the scene with You Are We. The album is fully crowd-funded, self-released and recorded in friends houses and their own warehouse they built themselves which makes the album feel formidable. While She Sleeps have albums that make you feel like you’re one of their family, but this contribution to their discography really cemented you are a brother/sister.

The album is brilliant. It is powerful, thought-provoking and my oh my is it heavy. The fact the album was made through blood sweat and tears and off their own fanbase really adds a dimension that most albums don’t have nowadays. Even down to fans having the opportunity to appear as crowd vocals on the album shows they are truly dedicated to us and their art. They impress with every release and show us all how much they have grown and surprised us by keeping a slightly oversaturated genre feeling refreshing and new. – WS

FULL REVIEW HERE

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30. Come Over When You’re Sober (Pt.1)
by Lil Peep

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As Lil Peep gained traction in the music industry over the past couple of years, he was met with as much love as he was hate. History has shown that artists that have come through with different and new music can be panned in their early career only years later to be hailed as revolutionary and pioneering. Lil Peep seems like he will be remembered as one of these artists and not just because of his untimely death but because his music was truly unique and innovative.

His music would blend the sounds of emo and sad rock with modern trap rap, sampling from artists such as The Microphones, Modest Mouse and many others usually tending to sample the melancholy guitar interlude passages from the artists. C.O.W.Y.S showcased Peep’s best songs to date and successfully portrayed how his music took the trap banger formula and made it into something more moody and introspective that other artists in the genre hadn’t achieved before him.

The C.O.W.Y.S released this year was only labeled as part 1, signifying Peep was only just getting started with his musical path and it goes without saying how heart-breaking it is knowing that he never lived long enough to put out more, however; his legacy although short will live on. – Liam Toner (@tonerliam)

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29. Trumpeting Ecstasy
by Full Of Hell

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Now to be considered as staples of the genre, grindcore band Full Of Hell released Trumpeting Ecstasy this year, one of the most succinct, brutal projects of heavy rock music for some time. Having released joint projects with extreme music legends like The Body and Merzbow, Full Of Hell combine all of their past sounds onto this blistering eleven track album.

Crawling Back To God is a standout track on the album, featuring one of the catchiest metal riffs of the year, punctuating the beginning and end of the track, adding to a culmination that is both frantic and almost satisfying. The title track is a perfect example of their past collaborations coming into fruition. Nicole Dollaganger provides subtle, swooping vocals over eerie, lo-fi noise, to then fall out onto punishing guitar stabs and screams, this track showing the band’s power-violence past, and giving a real, meaty kick into the listener’s consciousness.

Trumpeting Ecstasy should stand out in Full Of Hell’s already extensive discography, and with their second collaborative release with The Body also coming out this year, it can be easily said that they have had an electrifying 2017. – Charlie Leach (@YungBuchan)

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28. You’re Not As ___ As You Think
by Sorority Noise

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Sorority Noise have always dared to translate taboo subjects and themes into anthemic tracks, but You’re Not As _____ As You Think delves deep into the darkest crevices of the human mind.

Openly referencing his mental health on stage, Cameron Boucher honestly, and sometimes brutally, has put this into ten heart-wrenching anthems. Intertwining the in-your-face ballad-y likes of No Halo and the more ambient, stripped back First Letter From St. Sean displays their versatility and ability to pour passion into anything they do.

From A Portrait Of’s hindsight-ical tale of despair and desperation to losing “a basketball team to heaven” (Disappeared), YNA_AYT is one of, if not THE most important ‘alternative’ records of the past decade.

Sorority Noise offers the perfect accompanying soundtrack for doleful evenings spent reflecting on past experiences and by the blissful closer, New Room, you realise that maybe, just maybe, You’re Not As _____ As You Think. – Callum Thornhill (@cal_thornhill)

FULL REVIEW HERE

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27. English Tapas
by Sleaford Mods

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Same old Sleafords, but with a more professional feel to it, English Tapas perfectly dialed into the zeitgeist of Broken Britain. It was still the same mix of Andrew Fearn producing the beats and Jason Williams with the venomous vitriol, but the beats felt cleaner and the vocals felt dirtier.

No one is safe from the Mods’ attack, taking aim at “pretentious little bastards on social medias” in Just Like We Do, Boris Johnson in Moptop, and no prizes for who’s taking the flak in B.H.S. But as per, there’s also getting out on the piss in Army Nights & Messy Anywhere.

Wanna talk an evolution in sound? Look no further than I Feel So Wrong, which actually features a bit of crooning from our man Jase and the quite frankly weird, yet exciting Drayton Manored. As always, we dream of a world where Sleaford Mods‘ commentary isn’t needed, but for the now, we’re so happy to have them. – OB

FULL REVIEW HERE

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26. Ofbeldi
by Dauðyflin

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If you love the sound of noisy distortion and rampaging hardcore punk then Ofbeldi is the album for you. The album begins with screeching feedback and snarling vocals and quickly launches into complete sonic annihilation in the form of ripping hardcore punk. The track only lasts a mere 55 seconds but is a perfect statement of purpose letting the listener get used to the raw chaos that will continue screaming all the way to the album’s end.

Each member of the band is just performing so wild and cacophonously here. Whether it’s the venomous vocal work, the screaming guitar or the melodically tinged but equally aggressive bass work, the band come together as a tightknit but ear-splitting unit. The band sounds totally loose, which is not to be confused with sloppy, and they constantly sound like they’re about to go off the rails (but never do). Even when the band falls into slower tempo sections they still manage to sound just as vicious as they do when blasting along at punk speeds.

With 11 short songs, Ofbeldi is over in a mere 18 minutes of distorted chaos leaving its mark as one of the noisiest punk records of 2017. – LT

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25. MASSEDUCTION
by St. Vincent

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St Vincent takes a step further down the rabbit hole that is electro-pop. Each single is coupled with an arty video filled with as much colour as the record’s album cover, which features the behind of a woman in fluorescent pink tights, inviting the world to effectively kiss her arse.

Usually writing in the style of Kate Bush, from the perspective of a character, this album is one of her most personal records to date. While being overtly sexual in places, she creates an open intimacy with the listener. This is particularly prevalent on Saviour, a track drenched in sleazy synths and synthetic fetish imagery.

This body of work has cemented Annie Clark as a seminal voice of the femme experience of this generation. – Tilly O’Connor (@Tilly_Oconnor)

FULL REVIEW HERE

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24. Half Light
by Rostam

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It always feels like a backhanded compliment to mention Vampire Weekend next to Rostam’s name. Rostam Batmanglij is so much more than the éminence grise for one of the ‘00s most consistent indie groups. He’s produced tracks for Carly Rae Jepsen, Frank Ocean, and Charli XCX, among others; he’s one half of the one-off electronic band Discovery; and in September 2017, he released his first solo album Half-Light.

Half-Light didn’t catapult Rostam into the stratum of pop stardom he may have wanted, the music was too culturally diverse, too experimental, too masterful. But though the album didn’t give us a manifest chart-topping single, it reasserted the scrutiny and passion Batmanglij has always put into his work as a producer and songwriter. Wood leaps between continents to find the through line between Indian and Western European classical music. Rudy propels a Queer bildungsroman with the vim of Zydeco horns and Don’t Let It Get to You offers a pick-me-up ensconced in a sample from Paul Simon, that longstanding reference point in Vampire Weekend’s music.

Above all else, Half-Light is Rostam’s first real step out of VW’s shadow onto the path of what looks to be a promising solo career. – Sean Hannah (@shun_handsome)

FULL REVIEW HERE

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23. Brutalism
by Idles

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The album title of Idles’ breakout album from this year is an apt description of the aural experience they deliver. From the opener Heel/Heal (one of the best opening tracks of the year), Idles present themselves to British music in all their glory. With not providing much respite, Brutalism entered 2017 with a distinctive message: Idles are one of the most exciting British bands to appear in the last few years.

Though (as it has been said previously on many a music website) the band might wear their influences on their sleeves, they do so with such aplomb. Their sound is loud, and at times quite chaotic, they have developed an excellent balancing act, in which their post-punk sound never veers into the messy and unlistenable. With excellent hooks provided by the guitar work on the album, the visceral vocal talents of lead vocalist Joe Talbot and the frantic yet perfectly grounded bass and drums from by Adam Devonshire and Jon Beavis respectively, this is a truly excellent listen. If you want an album containing the best song ever written about TV chef Mary Berry, look no further! – CL

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22. Mourn
by Corbin

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There have been a lot of miserable albums this year (ones that evoke or explore that emotion, not make you feel it cause you’re suffering through it) and Mourn is no exception. The product of Corbin, formerly known as Spooky Black, this record is one fuelled by the sadness it creates via two important features.

The first of these is the fantastic set of vocals that are omnipresent on this album; they bleed with passion, sorrow, and fear, consistently creating this uneasy atmosphere that makes you feel terrified but at the same time will have you weirdly entranced. When he screams about how much he’s trying on Giving Up, you can feel the exhaustion and on Revenge Song, a particular highlight, Corbin‘s rage is bubbling under the surface with his true sadness being untenable.

An album that will sadly fall under the radar for many, Mourn is a challenging record that will have you in awe when it doesn’t have you biting your nails in un-easement. – LM

FULL REVIEW HERE

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21. A Black Mile To The Surface
by Manchester Orchestra

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Being one of the 21st centuries most prolific indie/emo acts, the pressure was on Manchester Orchestra to deliver. And deliver they did. A Black Mile to the Surface is a soaring, anthemic, bold and deeply sad album. An amalgamation of everything that Manchester Orchestra has done in the past, but it somehow sounds as fresh as MO always have.

Andy Hull’s lyrics are always debatably the best part of any project he touches, be it Manchester Orchestra, Bad Books or Right Away, Great Captain!, and that hasn’t changed. Whether he’s singing to his infant child (on The Sunshine), weaving a tale of an attack/suicide attempt at a supermarket (on album highlight The Grocery) or reviewing a love gone sour (The Gold), the words he uses are never, ever wasted.

Instrumentally, the band strays from what’s expected of them multiple times. The aforementioned The Sunshine, for example, has a shuffling drum beat and a killer groove to it, whereas album opener The Maze is a slice of arms-in-the-air, stadium-ready atmospheric rock.

In short, Manchester Orchestra continue to better themselves with each album. This is a truly stellar, vital album that I’d recommend to absolutely anyone. – Jake Cordiner (@jjjjaketh)

FULL REVIEW HERE

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20. Music From Before The Storm
by Daughter

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Music from Before the Storm is the soundtrack to the game Life is Strange, but it manages to stand by itself as one of the best albums of the year. The majority of the album is eerily instrumental. Elena’s voice only sweeping in occasionally to add to the vast atmosphere of the album. The songs flicker between from one extreme to the other; some being loaded with heavy distortion, others comfortingly soft and spaced out.

The real magic behind the album is how it is composed. Instruments, samples, and voices layer upon each other beautifully. Like most of Daughter’s music, Music from Before the Storm is heart-wrenching.

This album is bold and self-assured. When there are vocals, they flow in chants and echoes. You never know where the next song will take you. Although it was made to play along to a video game, this album is special as it is. – IM

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19. Gang Signs & Prayer
by Stormzy

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We all knew that Stormzy had chops when he dropped Shut Up (currently at 70,000,000 views on YouTube), but little did we know he had more chops than a butcher’s when he dropped his debut album, Gang Signs and Prayer. First things first, the album gets off to a flying start with First Things First, with the beats heavy & the flow as smooth as silk.

The best thing about this album though is its raw honesty, whether it’s Stormz being open about his mental health in Lay Me Bare, which many of us can relate to in the lyrics, or even, no matter what your beliefs are, how true he is to his faith in Blinded by Your Grace (Pt 1 & 2). He also pays tribute to his dear mum in 100 Bags, so it feels like just such a wholesome, honest & real album. No fronting, just one man opening the door on his life.

One of the highlights of this album is, you guessed it, Big For Your Boots. It’s a dancey bop that warns everyone to stay out of Big Mike’s way. Be real with yourself, you’ve loudly shouted “Rudeboy you’re never too big for Adele“, and you’re just waiting to tell someone “you’re getting way too old for a diss

The only drawback with this album is that it’s too broadly well produced, written & mixed to try and single tracks out. Sure, you might not listen to Mr. Skeng as much as Shut Up, but could you get rid of either?

UK Grime is only getting bigger & bigger and more into the public consciousness, and Stormzy is going to be one of the artists leading the charge, and one that will no doubt go down in history. – OB

FULL REVIEW HERE

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18. A Deeper Understanding
by The War On Drugs

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The newest War on Drugs album, A Deeper Understanding takes listeners on an hour-long journey of atmospheric sounding synths and guitar. Accompanying the beautiful instrumentals are Adam Granduciel’s dreamy vocals and intimate lyrics, which sound just as good as the 2014 release, Lost in the Dream.

At the time, it may have seemed that the previous album would be hard to top, but A Deeper Understanding certainly comes close. There are so many different layers to each song, every one meticulously crafted by Granduciel. It truly is his manic attention to detail that creates the unique atmosphere present throughout the album. This newest project definitely feels more optimistic and romantic than Lost in the Dream, which dealt with a rough breakup. The tracks are long and sweeping, littered with tiny details that must have made for a painstaking studio process for Adam Granduciel.

The War on Drugs have developed a more complete sound and matched their previous best album with this newest album. It’s great to hear the band continuing to put out amazing albums, although it may be another three years before their fans get another one. – EB

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17. Forced Witness
by Alex Cameron

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The success of Alex Cameron in 2017 can be put down to any number of things: his sleazy on-stage dance moves, his co-writing contributions to The Killers latest, his fantastically absurd and breathy Big Enough cameo.

But what cannot be overlooked is the sheer strength of the songwriting on his sophomore effort, Forced Witness. Musically, every song has an unshakeably addictive melody that you’ll find yourself singing long after the opening bass chug of Candy May kicks in, coupled with an appropriately cheesy instrumental that couples self-serious indie-songwriter with cheap 80s synth-rock that somehow manages to sound like plastic doused in inexpensive aftershave.

However, the heart and the soul of the record that will truly win you over is Cameron’s lyrics; having abandoned the sole persona of a failed entertainer from his debut to focus on several scummy narrators orbiting themes of toxic masculinity, fragile egos and insecure romances that simultaneously critique and make fun of such behaviour without every normalising it into making it acceptable – case in point on the disco strut of The Chihuahua: “Our love was like a fire, I pissed on it so I could sleep.”

The two elements come together in impeccable harmony on Stranger’s Kiss, a duet with Angel Olson that is as heartbreaking as it is hilarious, and leaves us in anticipation for Cameron’s next perfectly poised move. – Josh Adams (@jxshadams)

 

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16. Sleep Well Beast
by The National

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Following the release of Trouble Will Find Me and a period of intense touring, a breather was on the cards for The National. Their hiatus, albeit brief, spawned several side projects: Matt Berninger formed indie supergroup El Vy while the Dessner twins produced an ambitious Grateful Dead cover album.

Far from acting as a distraction, these extracurricular activities became vital ingredients of Sleep Well Beast. The goal was never to reinvent the wheel, as keen observers of the Cincinnati-via-Brooklyn sad dad quintet should be well aware if they’ve been paying attention since Alligator.

Instead, they’ve mastered the art of gradual evolution, adapting to new conditions with every new release. Berninger’s lyrics, grandiose and cryptic yet strangely familiar, cover the entire spectrum of human emotion – the optimism of youth, the crippling anxiety of marriage and parenthood, the awkward nature of social interaction. Whereas before he was brash and defiant in the face of adversity, now he sings with a sigh of resignation.

At the risk of sounding platitudinous, most The National albums are growers, arguably none more so than Sleep Well Beast; however, with repeated listens each and every song on this record reveals itself and, all of a sudden, it becomes a thing of breathtaking beauty and despair. – Kieran Cannon (@kiercannon)

FULL REVIEW HERE

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15. American Dream 
by LCD Soundsystem

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After their much-publicised Madison Square Garden farewell in 2011, it looked like LCD Soundsystem were no more.

Many years passed, speculation lingered and rumours swirled until eventually frontman James Murphy posted at great length on Facebook, confirming the reunion everyone was waiting for – well, almost everyone. Some fans were left disgruntled, especially those who attended that high profile final hurrah but when the late, great David Bowie commands it, who are we to argue? 

American Dream is a triumphant return to the spotlight for Murphy et al. and a fitting tribute to Bowie, the man who was instrumental in getting LCD to reform and whose musical legacy pervades the entire album. In Change Yr MindMurphy considers his place in the world as the onset of old age marches on: is he still as “dangerous now”? Absolutely. His razor-sharp wit and bombastic delivery are still as effective as ever, toing and froing between twisted Robert Fripp-esque bursts of guitar and apprehensive drumming. 

Call The Police and Tonite conjure up LCD tracks of old while How Do You Sleep? is the sprawling epicentre of the album. As it happens, though, the crowning achievement is the very first track – the crooning Oh Baby, arguably the finest song on the album and without doubt among the best material they’ve released to date. – KC

FULL REVIEW HERE

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14. Antisocialites
by ALVVAYS

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Alvvays’ hook-heavy, jangly take on dream pop is an amalgamation of many bands before them. A bricolage of trickle-down influence, the Ontarian dream pop group finds the cohesion between obvious forebears The Byrds and The Cranberries along with more inconspicuous acts such as Camper Van Beethoven and Vivian Girls. But in spite of the panoply of predecessors, Alvvays forged an inimitable, indelible sound on their sophomore effort Antisocialites.

Frontwoman Molly Rankin learns the stakes of true love on the shoegaze power pop anthem In Undertow, an epiphany that informs the rest of the record. Love can be elusive (Dreams Tonite), it can be saccharine (Lollipop (Ode to Jim)), but above all else, it can’t be forced. For all of the group’s lyrics, which range from cloying heartbreak to unbridled exultation, Alvvays succeed by virtue of their symbiotic musicianship. The band’s guileless, solid rhythm section lays the groundwork for Television-inspired guitar conversations and retro synth lines.

They may have slipped under the radar after the release of their eponymous debut, but Antisocialites proved that Alvvays are a band worthy of our attention. – SH

FULL REVIEW HERE

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13. After The Party
by The Menzingers

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There comes a time in the lives of all beer-swigging, crowd-surfing, amp-breaking rock bands, when a difficult question must be asked; ‘are we too old to be doing this?’. Different bands deal with this conundrum in different ways. Some, see Green Day, choose to ignore it completely. Others, see Blink-182, elect to grow up a little and are all the better for it (we’re ignoring the travesty of last years comeback record here). And then you have The Menzingers.
Moving away from their usual subject matter of all the emo cliches under the sun, the Scranton natives spent 2017 tackling the age question head-on, with their fifth album After the Party. And in doing so, they managed to produce the most universally resonant, and perhaps best, album of their career. 
All catchy melodies and thumping riffs as usual, what really marks the record as a standout is its sentiment. The whole thing is just packed full of sincerity, and while occasionally straying into cheesy territory, all 13 tracks serve as near-perfect illustrations of the bittersweet acceptance of growing older. – Rory McArthur (@rorymeep)

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12. CTRL
by SZA

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The debut album from SZA, CTRL was the breath of fresh air to R&B that 2017 needed. Exploring themes of insecurity, infidelity, and self-identity is nothing new but SZA’s unique approach is endlessly fascinating.

On CTRL, SZA discusses these topics with brutal honesty and is never kind to herself, laying her demons on the table for everyone to see, which makes the album so powerful, by showing that she will no longer allow herself to be ashamed of who she is, and if she lets the entire world see her insecurities then she can finally own them and overcome them.

In a saturated genre, SZA demands attention with an intricately detailed album, which includes various contributions from her mother who is giving her daughter advice throughout the album which relate to the themes SZA explores. With each listen, the album becomes more and more personal and it becomes almost overwhelming how much personality SZA poured into it.

There are so many little details that set SZA apart from her contemporaries and even though this is just her first attempt, she has already produced a classic. – Ethan Woodford (@human_dis4ster)

FULL REVIEW HERE

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11. Greatest Hits
by Remo Drive

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Remo Drive are an alt-rock three-piece from Minnesota who have come out of fucking NOWHERE with an album chock full of angsty bangers. Breakout single Yer Killin’ Me (which I also wrote about for the sites song of the year list, cheeky wee plug) set standards high prior to the release of the band’s debut studio full-length Greatest Hits (such a good bloody title), and thankfully those standards were met with ease.

Songs like Art School, Trying 2 Fool U and Summertime perfectly convey how it feels to be a pissed off 20 something. But they don’t just go for angst, the boys have a cracking ear for melody and, when the time’s right, can lay down a kick ass breakdown or two. The shouted vocals do well to make sure the listener pays attention to the sad and often hilarious lyrics and the instrumentation throughout is stellar.

I cannot say enough good things about this band and this album, genuinely. A bloody sensational debut from you and your dad’s new favourite band. – JC

FULL REVIEW HERE

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10. The Ooz
by King Krule

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The “Lounge Music” genre has long bore implications of class elitism and cultural appropriation. A diluted form of jazz used to fill the silences of parties feting middle-management promotions and quinquagenarian birthday celebrations, lounge music held no connection to working-class England.

But in mid-October, Archy Marshall (d/b/a King Krule) released The OOZ, a grime-covered, vitriolic reconfiguration of easy listening forged in the mind of a twenty-something savant with equal admiration for James Chance and Mark E. Smith. Replete with an imperious saxophone, murky but steady basslines, and a cockney voice harsh enough to shake all of London (and some of America) to attention, King Krule took lounge music from the ceramic-tiled living rooms of the upper middle class and transposes it into the seedy world of derelict youths.

The dramatis personae of The OOZ are the lowest of lowlifes; there’s the criminal who forgets his burner phone at the crime scene on Biscuit Town, the indigent transient of Logos, and the rapacious cross-species hybrid from Half Man Half Shark. But rather than cast conceited moral judgment on these misfits, Marshall sings almost empathetically about them. He knows he’s not much different from them. Maybe none of us are. – SH

FULL REVIEW HERE

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9. Flying Microtonal Banana
by King Gizzard & The Lizard Wizard

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When the first of King Gizzard’s 4 (5?) records of 2017 was announced, alongside the release of lead single Rattlesnake, at the tail end of last year, there were more than a few questions being asked. Microtones? What the hell are microtones? Is this out of tune? How many fucking frets are there on that guitar? Rattlesnake? Rattlesnake? Rattlesnake?
After the monumental success of the frenetic psych-punk of Nonagon Infinity, fans were perhaps expecting a continuation of that sound. Instead, the Australians crafted a slower, groovier record, one that required a little bit more time to grow on you. But give it the time and attention it needs, and this is an album you’ll be coming back to long after some of their other releases have been lost in their ever-growing discography.
From the tightly wound grooves of Nuclear Fusion to the towering darkness of Open Water, the record contains some of the finest moments not just of the band’s career, but of 2017 in general. Even when the songs don’t quite hit the mark as on Doom City, there remains the alluringly off-kilter clang of the microtones, keeping things interesting right through to the closing notes. – RM

FULL REVIEW HERE

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8. Visions Of A Life
by Wolf Alice

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Following up their critically adored debut My Love Is Cool, Wolf Alice returned this year with a follow-up that matched the potential they had shown the first time around.

Being a band that refuses to be defined by a genre, the London indie rock outfit continues that trend on Visions Of A Life, each track either harking back to sounds from their debut and building upon them or going in completely new directions ranging from angry grunge rock to folk. What sets Visions Of A Life apart from the myriads of other indie rock albums to come out this year is the sheer passion Wolf Alice have. Each track just had this special aura to it that sucks you in with each listen, and Ellie Rowsell’s status as one of the most exciting lead singers today is solidified with an incredibly versatile performance across the album that increases the effectiveness of the album significantly.

On this album Wolf Alice prove themselves to be an anomaly in British rock music right now, a band that constantly improves and make music that stands out on its own and feels important not only now, but no doubt in the foreseeable future. – EW

FULL REVIEW HERE

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7. Pure Comedy
by Father John Misty

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Father John Misty revels in being 10 steps ahead of everyone, and his position has never been as secure as it was with the release of Pure Comedy, the record that no one knew they needed until they got it. Josh Tillman’s 70-minute exploration of the human condition at large is witty, calculated, scathing, ironic and hopeful – sometimes all at the same time.

Sonically, Pure Comedy is incredibly cohesive while never repetitive; composed of grandiose piano ballads which feel distinct from one another due to the stunning horn and string sections which Tillman enlists on all of the record’s tracks, but never used to better effect than on emotional centrepiece, Leaving LA. The 10-verse track barely feels half that – the orchestra providing the perfect foil for Tillman’s uncharacteristically fragile vocal.
The lyrics are undoubtedly the record’s main selling point, however – with Leaving LA hearing Tillman introspectively exploring his past, condemning LA and mocking the song itself throughout its mammoth 13-minute run time. The lyrics never fail to grab the attention, whether Tillman is branding humans “demented monkeys”, or brutally holding God to account, it’s difficult not to hang on to his every word. – Andrew Barr (@weeandreww)

FULL REVIEW HERE

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6. A Crow Looked At Me
by Mount Eerie

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In a particularly miserable year, it’s rather apt that one of the best albums we came across was one riddled with grief; enter the stage Mount Eerie’s A Crow Looked At Me, something that we’re hesitant to even call a record considering how raw a document this is of Phil Elverum’s coping process after losing his wife.

There’s nothing ambiguous about the album: over the course of the 11 tracks, we see Elverum’s ability, or lack thereof, to come to terms with what has happened as clothes are given away, memories are fondly looked back upon and their daughter is left in a scary, new situation. As the closing track Crow flies above, it’s impossible not to feel a smidge of the same weight Elverum’s has painted for you be lifted from your shoulders.

It isn’t an easy listen but if you’re up for the challenge and want to witness this organic mish-mash of music and poetry then this is the art for you. – LM

FULL REVIEW HERE

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5. Melodrama 
by Lorde

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The title of 2017’s best pop record goes to Lorde, whose sophomore record Melodrama excels in just how self-aware a pop record it is. That shouldn’t be surprising, given Lorde rose to superstardom from megahit Royals, penned about her disillusionment from the lyrical content in much of the hip-hop which she loves.

The best word that can be used to describe Melodrama, both musically and lyrically, is meta. Lorde seems to mock the hallmarks of modern pop music, and revels in doing so. Sonically, it is heavily electronic and synthetic and while tracks like Sober and Homemade Dynamite could loosely be described as bangers, they revel in darkness and subtlety, rather than bright maxamalism like contemporaries such as Carly Rae Jepsen.

The Louvre is perhaps the past example of this where the verses masterfully build tension to what could be a huge chorus, only for the guitar to fade, leaving only a synthetic drumbeat over which Lorde nonchalantly sneers “broadcast the boom-boom-boom-boom, make ‘em all dance to it” in an apparent dig at what she sees contemporaries doing.

The album’s lyrics are just as smart throughout – with more than a few striving to the record’s title – “I hate the headlines and the weather” is a highlight, coming from closer Perfect Places, which serves as Lorde’s 101 of how to write a great pop song – with the quality of Melodrama, it’s a lesson many would be wise to listen to. – AB

FULL REVIEW HERE

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4. DAMN.
by Kendrick Lamar

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In a post To Pimp a Butterfly world, you could forgive Kendrick Lamar for taking it easy on whatever he decided to follow it up with. Be it the long rumoured collaborative album with J Cole (still waiting for that yin boys) or… the long-awaited collaborative album with Kanye West (again, still bloody waiting), whatever he decided to do, excitement was at fever pitch. 
Along comes DAMN. then, and it’s chuffing marvelous. If To Pimp a Butterfly was Kendrick staking his claim as the GOAT, DAMN. is him cementing his place at the top of the pile. It’s all go, from the spoken word intro BLOOD. to the confessional and pitch black DUCKWORTH. not a bar, nor a beat is wasted. And with only 3 features (including a great turn by Rihanna on LOYALTY. and, for some fucking mental reason, BONO on the brilliant anti-gun track XXX.), it’s almost entirely Kenny doing what Kenny does best: doing the hip hops better than anyone else.
We could throw as many superlatives as possible at Kendrick and this album but the music speaks for itself. Kenny’s lyricism and flow are leagues above almost everyone else in the rap game at the moment, and DAMN. proves that without a dog gamn shadow of a doubt. – JC

FULL REVIEW HERE

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3. Flower Boy
by Tyler The Creator

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Flower Boy roundly made tabloid headlines for Tyler’s apparent coming out on I Ain’t Got Time! (“I’ve been kissing white boys since 2004”), when the real headline should have been the fact that Flower Boy saw Tyler finally release a record mature enough for an admission like coming out.

Flower Boy hears Tyler far grown in every sense imaginable; lyrically, sonically, and as a result, artistically. Sonically, Flower Boy is radiant and gorgeous, with the instrumentals of many tracks (Garden Shed, See You Again) leaning towards Frank Ocean-esque R&B than brash hip-hop. Speaking of Tyler’s former Odd Future collaborator, Ocean pops up on highlight 911 / Mr Lonely, a disarmingly catchy and upbeat track where Tyler declares he is the “loneliest man alive”.

911 is an excellent microcosm for the record, as Ocean sounds gorgeous, but the Blonde mastermind sings little more than “Chirp chirp!”. Flower Boy is full of features but is a lesson in how to use them perfectly. Big names pop up such as Rex Orange County and ASAP Rocky, and undoubtedly add to the tracks they appear on; however, their appearances merely feel like cameos on the Tyler show, a show which he runs with glee throughout undoubtedly the best record of his career so far; it’s no wonder he feels like Glitter. – AB

FULL REVIEW HERE

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2. Big Fish Theory
by Vince Staples

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The real appeal of an album like Big Fish Theory is that from a totally superficial level, you’ll have an absolute joy from start to finish without putting much thought into your surroundings.

Tracks like Love Can Be are, from a surface level, absolutely bangers that aren’t so much sprinkled but aptly drowned in their influences, specifically UK dance and Detroit techno. The hooks on here are monumental, no doubt etching themselves into your cranium without a moment’s hesitation.

Upon further listens, and thorough analysis, it’ll be difficult not to find yourself admiring the lavish, almost avant-garde production or the nihilistic dark lyrics of Mr. Vince Staples. It’s a mesh that really shouldn’t work but it miraculously does, especially on the likes of BagBak that packs in a near untamable banging bass while Staples fires out beautiful lyrics to his future baby mama one minute and making his political aspirations for his brothers clear the next.

Big Fish Theory is without a doubt one of the most compact, well-made pieces of art 2017 has provided with us, easily balancing social awareness, introspective interest and some of the best hip-hop production we’ve experienced this decade. – LM

FULL REVIEW HERE

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1. SATURATION I
by Brockhampton

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BROCKHAMPTON, a fourteen man strong boyband who met on a Kanye West fan page ended up being the surprise package that 2017 needed. Despite most of the members being basically unknown, they made themselves impossible to ignore by releasing three albums in one year, titling the collective the Saturation trilogy.

Any one of the three albums could have made this list but looking back, I feels the most significant. Announcing the arrival of “America’s favourite boyband” Saturation is a collection of hip-hop bangers that calls back to classics such as My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy.

Each member, whether it be Matt, Kevin, Ameer, Dom, Merlyn or JOBA, have their own strengths and personalities and it creates such an exhilarating listen as each track brings new surprises and they prove time and time again that they are capable of producing fresh, exciting hip hop that the genre desperately needed.

Everything on this album is done with near perfection, from the intelligence of the lyrics to the intricacy in the production, there is so much to appreciate about Saturation and is especially commendable when they somehow managed to make two other albums that were just as good all in one year, 2017 certainly felt the presence of BROCKHAMPTON.

FULL REVIEW HERE

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If you want to listen to any of the albums mentioned then follow our playlist down below:

https://open.spotify.com/embed/user/111518578/playlist/4ZoDUvJwXpxJGBWEmYBj3D

 

Top 50 Songs of 2017

We’ve been fairly negative this week, what with the moaning behemoth that was our ten worst tracks of the year list, but let us assure you that music in 2017 hasn’t been terrible: in fact, it’s arguably the strongest it has been since the glory year of 2015. There’s still another week to go before we give you the round up of the records we couldn’t get enough of but until then, the BLINKCLYRO team have a treat for you.

This year’s Top 50 Songs list marks the first year where it isn’t just Liam compiling his favourite tunes: all the writers for the site have submitted their top 10 tracks of the year and after compiling them, tallying the points and laying them out, this post before you is the end result of that. So strap yourself in, relax and prepare yourself for a bucket load of great tunes that’ll make you feel blessed to have ears.

50. Blaenavon – Orthodox Man

First heard in 2015 when played to a crowd of under twenty, Orthodox Man has remained very much the same between then and now. However, now played to sell out crowds it has become somewhat of a fan favourite and it is clear to see why. It is fun, it is exciting, it gets the crowd going. What more could you want from a debut record single?

49. The Xcerts – Daydream

What sets The Xcerts out from others is the vocal style, and Daydream is no exception. Murray Macleod’s Aberdonian accent beams through the track and the catchy riff and drums make it a dance along track. Throw in that beautifully constructed bridge and you have yourself an upbeat pop rock song, that is sure to send the Xcerts flying into 2018.

48. The War On Drugs – Holding On

Holding On is a highlight pick from the new War on Drugs album and makes for easy listening with a dreamy feel across the instrumentals and vocals. The fact that this song stands out on A Deeper Understanding, which is an already amazing album, testifies to the quality of the track. The winding journey that the track takes you on is definitely one to remember.

47. The Mountain Goats – Unicorn Tolerance

This funky pop track off this year’s Mountain Goats album is remarkable in both its familiarity, in terms of lyricism from Darnielle, and harmonised chorus, taken straight out of the bands previous works; it is notable too for its difference, with a very chill melodic pop beat going through, and an almost dreamlike feel, making something that old fans, as well as Mountain Goats VLs, will get.

46. Pip Blom – Babies Are A Lie

Hailing from Amsterdam, Pip Blom have been around for around half a decade now yet continue the evolution from, as they put it, the girl with little guitar to a full-on band that hit their stride on this tune; a chill track that eases in with a simple introduction and lets its hair loose on its earworm of a chorus.

45. Benjamin Clementine – Phantom of Aleppoville 

From this year’s I Tell A Fly, delivered by the avant-garde maestro Benjamin Clementine, this is very much a high point experimentally for the album, with a lon sweeping intro, blending in classical music, after an anxiety inducing chant early on with the track’s lyrics really shining as the song reaches its end.

44. The Smiths Street Band – Birthdays

I feel overwhelmed so I wanna be alone but then when I’m alone I feel lonely” were the words shared on the Australian rock outfit’Instagramam about Birthdays, a romance heavy tune that features on the band’s frankly underrated LP More Scared Of You Than You Are Of Me. Transparent and deeply emotive, The Smiths Street Band manage to effortlessly discuss issues of mental health and desire over this tight 3-minute odd track.

43. Idles – Mother

2017 was a fantastic year for Bristol outfit Idles, and their single Mother punched and kicked straight into the music communities consciousness. With scathing, growling lyrics from frontman Joe Talbot, the song was a perfect shot of heavy guitar music arrived with aplomb this year. This track stands out on their excellent album Brutalism for its much-needed commentary on the social fabric of our country.

42. Woes – Losing Time

Opening with an excellent sounding pop punk riff, Losing Time doesn’t hesitate to go huge. The vocals are reminiscent of the bands’ self-titled EP released last year, and both singers vocals blend brilliantly to create a beautiful harmony. The bridge of the track slows right down, with lead vocalist David Jess passionately shouting, before getting back to business: Woes are definitely one to watch in 2018.

41. Tommy Genesis – Tommy

While there’s a solid bit of production in the form of a Charlie Heat beat, Tommy‘s main draw is the display and establishment of herself as an aggressive and hyper-sexual rapper who can stand her own ground. With the bravado and confidence that Tommy Genesis holms, we wouldn’t be surprised to see her come out with something major in the near future.

40. Dua Lipa – New Rules (Initial Talk Remix)

It’s no secret that Dua Lipa seemingly came out of nowhere to deliver one of the biggest pop tunes of the year, one with a great sense of empowerment. Initial Talk thought that New Rules was missing something and decided to give it a dollop of 80’s gloss, an odd decision but one that works very well for a song that could have easily found itself sang by the pop juggernauts from that decade.

39. Enter Shikari – Undercover Agents

Easily one of the best tracks off The Spark & one of the most accessible Shikari songs, Undercover Agents is a bouncy number that’ll get the whole floor howling at the moon. Is it a song about Facebook or Instagram, or is “I want to see your body” covering for something else?

38. N.E.R.D – Lemon

Though it could be argued to be more the “Pharrell and Rihanna show” rather than a full-blown N.E.R.D comeback, this song is still a bonafide club banger. Just like the lyrics, the production bounces along with deep 808 bass kicks and a high popping synth, while in the latter part of the song, Rihanna raps with a swagger that is seldom heard.

37. Rostam – Bike Dream

Aeronautical oranges, continental paintings, an uxorious pair of boys. These are some of the images that populate Rostam’s Bike Dream, the fanciful second track of his excellent debut Half-Light. Atop the synth-drum dynamo powering the song is the exultation of Rostam seeing himself in the myriad New Yorkers ambulating around 14th Street. Amid the chaos, Rostam reaches the bittersweet summation of his many romances: “Telling me something or nothing, never the one thing I wanna hear”.

36. St Vincent – Slow Disco

Near the culmination of Annie Clark’s neon pop masterclass, Masseduction, sits one of her finest songs yet. An emotionally affecting powerhouse, Slow Disco stands out as a work of stripped back beauty amidst the sea of oddball experiments. On first listen it may just seem a welcome variation from the robotic and futuristic sounds of the rest of the record, but with time it reveals itself as the albums powerfully vulnerable highlight.

35. Vistas – Retrospect

Latest single Retrospective is everything we know and love this Edinburgh pop-rock outfit for. Opening up with the catchiest of riffs, the nod-along melody kicks in with frontman Prentice Robertsons’ spectacular vocals create a happy, feel-good vibe. The band has worked tirelessly the past two years and it is now all beginning to pay off with this tune being evident of the progress they’ve made.

34. Protomartyr – My Children

The second single to be released from their latest album and one of the most complete songs they’ve recorded yet, Protomartyr have managed to distill almost every aspect of their music into a deeply satisfying 3 minutes and 42 seconds. An ominous, mumbled intro gives way to angular guitars as anti-frontman Joe Casey delivers a caustic take on issues of growing old, remaining childless and the implications that might have on his legacy.

33. Alex Cameron – Runnin’ Outta Luck

Who would have thought that a satirical concept album based around the trials and tribulations of toxic masculinity and fragile egotism could be so catchy? The third single from 2017’s delightfully playful Forced Witness epitomises the thematic musical and lyrical consistences that run deep through the record via a bombastic, synth-embellished sound that recalls the classic rock and pop of the 1980s with an unrelentingly ear-worming chorus.

32. Harry Styles – Sign Of The Times

2017 marked the year that the members of One Direction stepped out on their own and released their debut solo material, and unarguably the best track born of the hiatus has come from unofficial band leader Harry Styles, who boldly emerged with Sign of the Times, a 5-minute epic which channels heroes Prince and David Bowie, effortlessly building from a solemn piano into to a rock opera without breaking sweat. Styles vocal performance is enthralling throughout, growing with the track from a brooding opening before howling “WE”VE GOT TO GET AWAYYY” in the epic climax, the track’s escapism aided by a choir and a glam-rock guitar tone elevating Styles’ already huge vocal into the stratosphere.

31. Clairo – Pretty Girl

Clairo seems to be fitting in remarkably well to her newfound position as a self-aware, bedroom pop artist. As you may expect, Pretty Girl is a relationship influenced song but one that finds pleasure in pointing out the flaws of superficially lead ones with a simple music video only exasperating the simplistic charm that she delivers in bucketloads.

30. Phoebe Bridgers – Funeral

A cut from her debut album, this track from Phoebe Bridgers is a real story of Bruce Springsteen proportions, delivering a thought-provoking, heartfelt and genuinely sad song, involving the artiste singing at a funeral: just as morbid and depressing as you would expect but with a glimmer of beauty.

29. Peach Pit – Being So Normal

Described as being “chewed bubblegum pop” by, well, themselves, Peach Pit manage to leave a muffled indent with this eponymously titled track off their debut LP; the lead smooth vocals may sound exhausted but when backed up by warm guitars and an undeniable crisp production, it’s hard not to feel yourself mellowed out and enthralled.

28. The Vegan Leather – Shake It

This paisley disco-pop outfit’s debut single was one of the hottest Scottish indie hits of the year, almost anthemic in its delivery; with a fantastic dance beat to accompany it. One of the most notable elements of the track is the harmonies between male and female fronts of the band, Gian and Marie respectively, working together to deliver a positively electric track.

27. King Krule – Dum Surfer

Dum Surfer, from King Krule’s album The Ooz, amplifies the very darkest aspects of his music. The lyrics are aggressive and unsettling. Krule’s deep and brooding voice matches the violent imagery which contrasts starkly with the jazzy saxophone and abundance of percussion. It sounds like nothing else but manages to stand by itself as one of the best tracks of the year.26. Young Fathers – Only God Knows

Young Fathers provided the backbone to the Trainspotting 2 soundtrack. Included was the beautifully layered track, Only God Knows. Accompanied by Leith Congregational Choir, the trio from Edinburgh create three and a half minutes heart pounding, distorted bliss: it’s impossible to not find yourself smiling when this song comes on. Not only does it undeniably bring the other songs from T2 together but also establishes the versatility of Scottish hip-hop.

25. Lil Peep – Save That Shit

The “Pt. 1” affixed to Lil Peep’s debut album Come Over When You’re Sober will forever serve as a reminder of what Gustav Åhr’s career might have been. A sense of death’s rapid encroachment pervaded much of Peep’s music, and last month, a fatal overdose granted his self-fulfilling prophecy.

Standing out among Åhr’s robust oeuvre is Save That Shit, a maudlin breakup song featuring spidery post-grunge guitars, tightly-wound trap drums, and Lil Peep’s trademark gruff whine. The details of the couple’s relationship are in constant flux: “All she want is payback,” “You ain’t getting nothing I’m saying, don’t tell me you is,” “Do I make you scared? Baby, won’t you take me back?

The optimist in him wants to salvage the relationship, but the realist in him knows he can’t save that shit.

24. Corbin – Giving Up

When Corbin dropped his album Mourn earlier this year, it showcased his soulful vocal talents over moody and mournful cloud rap and RnB beats which have stuck out in our minds over this year though Giving Up is the track that has remained at the forefront of our minds.

The synths create a very downtrodden atmosphere to begin with and bring you into a state of melancholy where you can then be lulled by Corbin’s silky smooth voice. The drums kick in about 2:30 into the song which lifts the track considerably but the depressive quality of this track just gets stronger as Corbin’s vocals become more powerful and desperate near the end.

Taking into account the song’s lyrics’ focus on suicide makes this track a total emotional barrage, but a fucking good one.

23. Sorority Noise – A Portrait Of

Although Sorority Noise have teased listeners with lyrics and themes meaningful enough to rip your heart from your chest, 2017’s A Portrait Of is when the depth of the band really hit home. All of YNA_AYT is a journey into the deepest crevices of your conscience, but when the sophomore track opens with “I’ve been feeling suicidal..” you know you’re going to be in for an emotional ride.

Roaring a mid-section poetical giving reference to living his life as a continuation of theirs, Cameron Boucher truly opens up here and by the end of the track you’re left speechless, in tears or both.

The instrumentation is not ghoulish, nor is it an overly slow ballad to emphasise the lyrics, it is standard Sorority Noise in-your-face riff-topia with cutting hooks, dominant drums and quite frankly an elegant yet boisterous glue holding everything in place.

22. SZA – Drew Barrymore

Throughout her debut album CTRL, SZA discusses both relationships with others and herself with remarkable honesty and this is most evident on Drew Barrymore.

An ode to SZA’s favourite actress, the song’s themes are reminiscent of Barrymore’s iconic roles of women finding their identities. Similarly, on the track, SZA admits her insecurities and instead of being embarrassed by them, she sees a piece of herself in one of her biggest idols.

It is rare to see such difficult emotions towards relationships expressed so directly and with that comes sincerity that makes this track resonate so deeply; anyone that’s ever felt inadequate will both appreciate those feelings described so accurately and also a reminder that even people as talented as SZA feel the same way.

21. Mount Eerie – Real Death

Artistic expressions of death and grief are rarely ever as direct as they are on A Crow Looked At Me, an album dealing with the of passing Mount Eerie mastermind Phil Elverum’s wife Geneviève Castrée at the age of thirty-five. Yet in the opening track, Elverum insists that his record is exactly not that: “Death is real… it’s not for singing about, it’s not for making into art”.

With every word his cracked and pained voice utters, the listener gains only a minute sense of what it must be like to have been put through such a traumatic ordeal, and then shift through the aftermath. It’s a song so heartbreakingly beautiful that I struggle sometimes to listen to it in full – but I’m still glad that such a succinct statement of personal loss exists in today’s world.

20. Everything Everything – Desire

Desire feverishly builds, reaching a chorus featuring so many layered vocals, it sounds like an entire choir made up of Josh Higgs’ indulgent falsetto. The guitar riff at times rings like early naughties math rock in the best possible way and topping it all off are some very on brand Everything Everything lyrics “I am a pencil pusher with the pencil pusher blues“.

The beat stomps on through from the start, breaking at times into a delicate two-step instantly transporting you to a sweaty dancehall. It’s a song that makes it near impossible not to dance; some of the best indie pop we’ve had all year.

19. Kirin J. Callinan – Big Enough (Ft. Alex Cameron, Molly Lewis & Jimmy Barnes)

This is one of the rare songs on this list that has to be heard to be believed, especially in conjunction with its fabulously grandiose music video. Country twangs, EDM drops, heavy metal screams and a fist-pumping, chest-burstingly triumphant list of arbitrary countries, continents and states for a conclusion that, similar to marmite or self-immolation, will change your life for the better or the worse.

The reason it works and not devolve into the aural equivalent of a thirteen-way pile up on the M8 is the strength of the songwriting and the dynamics of the production, both of which create an addictive cocktail of a serotonin rush that never fails to lift your spirits. That, or make your face cringe so hard it cracks in two, but if it does that then you probably hate fun.

18. LCD Soundsystem – tonite

If James Murphy and co.’s first two comeback singles were intriguing yet divisive, then tonite firmly solidified the validation for their return to the stage, whilst simultaneously setting the scene for the album upon which it settles into snuggly in the middle third.

Lyrically, Murphy rearms his iconically ironic New York cool stance but with an updated penchant for the self-aware, allowing himself to deprecate the stagnant state of the charts without ever falling into the “Old Man Yells At Cloud!” trap that haunts many of rock music’s elder statesmen.

Pounding behind the words is a groovy instrumental that takes its cues from Daft Punk and The Human League, and reaffirms LCD Soundsystem’s place on the dancefloor, and indeed our hearts. We’ve missed you, Murphy.

17. The Menzingers – Thick As Thieves

With February’s After the Party, Scranton natives The Menzingers reached a career peak. A wonderful record bursting at the seams with shout-a-long slices of life, it establishes the band as a bonafide grade-A rock outfit. An ode to reckless abandon, Thick as Thieves encapsulates all that is great about the album.

The whole track just drips with an endearing sense of nostalgia and sincerity, with vocalist Greg Barnett gleefully yelling of ‘building castles of cans and bottles’ without a trace of cynicism or irony. The chorus, perhaps the best the band has ever come up with, seems tailor-made for crowds to scream back at the stage; it’s just joyous.

If you can get it out of your head, you’re not human.

16. Remo Drive – Yer Killin’ Me

What a belter this track is. A slice of raucous, driving, almost poppy emo from the Minnesota 3-piece Remo Drive’s beauty of a debut album Greatest Hits (killer title).

There’s such an infectious venom in frontman Erik Paulson’s vocals and lyrics that you almost can’t help but be subconsciously pissed off at whoever’s wronged him.

The mathy breakdown towards the end of the track is delicious as well. Yer Killin’ Me is a perfect introduction to the world of Remo Drive, and one that would easily fit into your running playlist or your moody playlist. Brilliant.

15. Lil Uzi Vert – XO Tour Llif3

The king of emo rap’s magnum opus. XO TOUR LIiF3 by Philadelphia’s own Lil Uzi Vert manages to walk the tightrope between depressing as fuck and club banger with aplomb. Flexing about his car one minute and lamenting a failing relationship in the next, this is a deceptively complex slice of hip-hop from one of the most exciting MCs of 2017.

Mr. Vert explores concepts that most modern rappers wouldn’t dare touch, the likes of how maybe drug abuse isn’t that good and suicide. On a surface level it’s a cracking trap track, but if you listen to the lyrics it’s a sad portrait of a man who’s a bit lost in the world of hip-hop. And that’s what makes it so good.

14. King Gizzard & The Lizard Wizard – Open Water

Choosing a highlight from King Gizzard’s extensive set of 2017 releases is no mean feat. From tightly wound prog to loosely held together jazz pop, the range this band have displayed this year trumps what most bands achieve across their whole career.

Way back in February, the group released the finest of these efforts, Flying Microtonal Banana, and with it, Open Water, the seven-minute colossus that stands as the jewel in the crown.

Bursting with pitch black imagery and fluid, winding licks, it sees the band really push themselves to their limit. Their drums had never been quite so ferocious before, the atmosphere never quite so delightfully disorientating, and the end result rarely quite so brilliant. 

13. Carly Rae Jepsen – Cut To The Feeling

Carly Rae Jepsen‘s transition from early 2010’s meme to critically applauded pop artist has been one of the most interesting moments over the past few years and this cut for animated flick Leap continues the trend.

We could easily discuss the effortlessly ascending and descending bits of production that tie into the Canadian singer’s wonderful pipes or her delivery from hushful whispering to ambitious proclamations; the hook, line, and sinker of Cut To The Feeling is just how bloody fun it is and in another dark and dreary year, we need more of these than ever.

12. The National – Day I Die

Bryan Devendorf herein stakes his claim as one of indie’s pre-eminent percussionists, kicking off one of the highlights of Sleep Well Beast with a frenetic drum intro. Relentlessly uptempo and featuring guitar licks reminiscent of The Cure, themes of marital affairs are navigated with reference-laden lyrics.

Matt Berninger boasts that, “Young mothers love me, even ghosts of / Girlfriends call from Cleveland“, although he’s clearly still more concerned about the no-mans land his current relationship occupies, struggling to understand where exactly things stand.

During the bridge, further context is given to “great uncle Valentine Jester“, a character visited previously and, as it happens, someone who Berninger shares a lot in common with, particularly when he gets “a little punchy with the vodka“.

11. Lorde – Green Light

Fresh from a break-up, Lorde’s second album, Melodrama, explores dealing with losing someone for the first time and all the thoughts that come with it. The first single, Green Light, starts desperate and heart wrenching.

The song opens with her raw, slow vocals and simple piano, but builds quickly to a fast dance anthem, flinging her reputation as a moody teenage songstress into the mainstream. The sincerity in her vocals mixed with the constant change of pace creates a warmth inside your stomach. It’s a song to cry but also to move on to. Lorde is showing us how to dance through the pain.10. Frank Ocean – Chanel

Frank Ocean is famed as one of modern music’s lyricists for his complexity and deft storytelling talents. However, Ocean throws this subtlety out of the window in the mic-drop of an opening couplet to surprise single Chanel – “My guy pretty like a girl / and he got fight stories to tell”.

This sets the tone for Chanel’s lyrical tone – it’s part bashful, part confessional, varying as Ocean drifts between singing and rapping – displaying a mastery of each. The dreary beat is the perfect bed for Ocean’s varied delivery, and transitions into perhaps Ocean’s most iconic hook yet – “I see both sides like Chanel” – another lyrical masterstroke as he flips hip-hop’s obsession with brands into an expression of sexuality.

9. Stormzy – Big For Your Boots

Stormzy seems like one of the nicest guys in music, but Big For Your Boots is a definite warning to anyone tries stopping his rise. His flow is incredible throughout the whole song, and some of the lines are solid gold.

Had a peng ting named Amy telling me to come round hers on a Valerie ting“. Sublime. The whole of GSAP was one of the standout albums of 2017, but this was the biggest diamond in the jewelers.

8. Paramore – Hard Times

Where do you start with the summery, pop anthem that is Hard Times?! The emo, pop-punk icons of yesteryear seemingly flipped their iconic style on its head and replaced it with a neon light complementing, almost sickly pink doused, upbeat classic.

Hayley Williams’ voice sounds as good, if not better, as their Riot! days and the re-addition of founding drummer Zac Farro adds a warming, sentimental value for the old-skool Paramore fans.

What we have is effectively an infectiously catchy piece of pop elegance from someone who was the antithesis of Hard Times. A fluorescent burst of colourful chaos, synths galore and a something that is a simple yet strangely complex arrangement of upbeat fun.

7. Father John Misty – Pure Comedy

Father John Misty’s third LP is comfortably the most lyrically ambitious release this year – providing social commentary on the grandest scale imaginable. This is best executed on the record’s stunning title track where Josh Tillman gives his perspective on “the comedy of man” – beginning with the birth process and arriving at religion with a lot in between – on the most grandiose score Tillman’s voice has ever graced.

The lyrics are the star of the show here, however, with Tillman addressing the human race at large with observations like “their illusions they have no choice but to believe”, however, the lyrics never take themselves too seriously, especially as he smirks “how’s this for irony?” in a subtle nod to his Father John Misty persona.

6. Brockhampton – Star

In a year where BROCKHAMPTON dropped three albums, there were several stand-out tracks that defined their year but none more memorable than STAR.

This track has a unique theme with its constant pop culture references. From Dom McLennon’s rapid-fire name dropping from Matthew McConaughey to Liam Neeson to Ameer Van’s bragging about being “the black Tom Hanks” and being “kingpin like Jay Z, dance moves like JT”. The track finishes on perhaps their strongest verse of the year as Kevin Abstract pronounced himself “Heath Ledger with some dreads” in a hilarious yet vicious verse that mixes references to pop culture and his own sexuality with ease.

America’s newest boyband have been on fire this year and that’s no more evident than on STAR.

5. Gorillaz – Ascension (Ft. Vince Staples)

When Vince Staples strutted onto the stage unannounced midway through Gorillaz’ sold out Hydro show, it was clear that the already fantastic gig was about to reach a new level. Staples’ stage presence was electric, his short frame covering almost every inch of the arena’s huge stage.

Somehow, the Long Beach MC manages to convey that energy as well on record as he does live on apocalyptic banger Ascension. Beginning with a quick-fire Staples verse atop a wartime air horn which soon gives way to Staples’ nonchalant attitude to the end of the world with the lyrics “the sky’s falling baby / drop that ass ‘fore it crash”.Gorillaz latest record Humanz was criticised for being too guest-heavy, but with Staples in such electrifying form, you can’t blame Damon Albarn for giving him the spotlight across his 2 lightning-quick verses.

As much as Staples is on fire, this still feels like a Gorillaz track. An Albarn verse is interspersed between Staples’ and is the perfect foil: Albarn sounds his age in contrast with Staples’ youthful exuberance: his verse darker, gloomier and more measured. He is happy to give the spotlight back to Staples who trivialises the apocalypse once more; with Staples on the mic, the apocalypse has never seemed so exciting.

4. Vince Staples – Yeah Right (Ft. Kendrick Lamar & Kucka)

Wouldn’t you know it – two tracks featuring Vince Staples back to back and boy, does the man deserve the high rankings on this list; anyone with a vague knowledge of Odd Future will have been made aware of the rapper’s potential and while he’s released some solid solo material, this track off Big Fish Theory certifies that there’s gold in them there hills.

Packing in the stellar production that can be found over the course of the entirety of Vince’s sophomore LP, Yeah Right teases the listener with his trademark delivery and a subdued instrumental before it’s released like a pack of lions with Detroit techno coursing through their blood. The sheer velocity of the bass borderlines on untenable at moments which adds to not only the power this song possesses but how closely this album walks the line between experimental and excruciating.

Then there’s that Kendrick verse which may possibly be the best guest bars to have been spat all year with an abundance of meta, serious, humourous and braggadocious lines that’ll etch themselves into your cranium. Tie in that bridge by Kucka which has a reminiscent tinge of old school UK Grime and you’re left with one of the greatest hip-hop tunes of the year.

3. Wolf Alice – Don’t Delete The Kisses

Already known for being able to essentially do anything, Wolf Alice proved that once again when they defined the modern love song with Don’t Delete The Kisses.

Ellie Rowsell’s lyrics have never been better even though they are the most sentimental she’s ever written. “I might as well write all over my notebook that you ‘rock my world!’” she admits in one of two verses Rowsell delivers in an almost talkative tone that mimics the thoughts going through her head; it somehow encapsulates these thoughts that everyone experiences in a creative way.

Don’t Delete The Kisses is unashamedly lovesick and cliché, and it’s confidence forces a massive smile onto your face as Rowsell’s closing words “I see the signs of a lifetime, you til I die” would manage to touch even the most cynical of hearts. The second single from sophomore album Visions of a Life, such an instant classic was unprecedented and will be hard for Wolf Alice to top but for now, they can revel in the success of creating a song that will undoubtedly remind a whole generation of fans of the person that they love.

2. Tyler The Creator – 911 / Mr. Lonely

True to form, the 10th track of Tyler’s widely acclaimed comeback project Flower Boy is a two-parter – a reoccurring theme across each of his albums. It’s a perfect synopsis of the dichotomy between the two different personalities of the record – one side is airy, melodic and full of summery optimism; the other, introspective and brooding.

The beauty of this track and, indeed, the rest of the album is the way Tyler reconciles these aspects and lays them bare so candidly. Perhaps one of the most apparent throwbacks to earlier, darker material such as Goblin, he alludes to his erstwhile depression throughout – in 911 he takes a philosophical approach, realising his own experiences can help him relate to others. Portraying a soothing voice on the other end of the phone, perhaps an emergency call handler, he introduces himself: “My name is Lonely, nice to meet you”.

Soon, though, he finds himself the one most in need of reassurance as he lapses back into despair in Mr. Lonely. The beat becomes dark and snare-heavy as he condemns his outwardly loud and brash personality, also questioning whether materialistic pursuits have ever really helped to alleviate that omnipresent feeling of loneliness. The last line cuts the deepest of all: reaching for a friend “so I never have to press that 911”.

1. Kendrick Lamar – DNA.

Regardless of your opinion on DAMN., light 7 or not, there’s no denying that 2017 has very much been the year of Kung Fu Kenny himself. From the teaser track The Heart Part IV tearing apart America’s newly elected toddler/President to his comeback single Humble, along with its subsequent meme value, to the hotly discussed topic of how his fourth LP should be played, there are very few artists who managed to stay relevant for all the right reasons in 2017.

A constantly evolving artist, think back to K Dot on Good Kid, m.A.A.d City or the existential, jazz poet on To Pimp A Butterfly, Kendrick Lamar is the most important figure in hip-hop at the moment and certifies this perfectly with D.N.A. An introspective and aggressive behemoth, this track serves not only as a reflection of himself as an idolised and sought after celebrity (Only Lord knows I’ve been goin’ hammer / dodgin’ paparazzi, freakin’ through the cameras) but it’s so much more than that.

True to his roots and heritage, D.N.A is primarily about Kendrick as a black man and in a year where race was the focus of some of the most despicable moments of the year in America, its message is more important than ever: the feature of a Fox News anchor stating that his music “has done more damage than racism ever has” only provokes him into becoming the passion-driven, bar spitting activist that music needs more of.

As he ends on some vicious lines, the inclusion of “peace to the world” could be taken literally or be a homophone for the slang for a gun; either way, the intentions are made clear on a song that seems to sum up this year into a claustrophobically tight 3 minutes, six seconds. 

https://open.spotify.com/embed/user/111518578/playlist/4T1V1dcSEhkDsZcyny9CWY


So there you have it, our definitive list of the best songs we’ve heard all year. I’d like to thank the following people for contributing not only their rankings which helped make the list but also the little write-ups they did for each track: 

Album Review: Brockhampton – Saturation II

By Ryan Martin (@RyanMartin182)

In the music industry, following up a successful debut album is often hard to do. It’s a rarity to see an artist carry over what made their debut so exciting with such effortless consistency. Brockhampton, the self-proclaimed “boyband” of 20-24 year olds making music independently out of their house, have done that. They have arguably improved on their debut within the two months since its release.

Brockhampton initially caught waves throughout the internet through their wildly unique self-made music videos for their debut, Saturation. Saturation II followed that same formula and put out music videos for GUMMY, SWAMP, JUNKY, and SWEET. All videos are introduced by web-producer/producer member Robert Ontinient with the now infamous line “Me Illamo Roberto” Ontinient handles all the skits throughout Saturation II as he did in Brockhampton’s first album. The skits are now referred to as scenes as Saturation II follows a five-letter-word rule for every track except the last track which has six. If this sounds familiar, it’s because they did the same thing with Saturation but with four and five letters respectively.

Throughout Saturation II, tracks seamlessly transition into one another without losing a consistent vibe or mood. Tracks also will splinter apart to make way for a new idea or hook, such as the blistering energy of QUEER that flips to an Outkast inspired hook before you have a second to breathe. Kevin Abstract, the ringleader of Brockhampton, usually handles the hooks and has a knack for creating sticky catchy choruses influenced from the likes of M.I.A. and Pharrell. Tracks like SWEET, GUMMY, SWAMP and TOKYO come to mind.

Almost every hook on the album is memorable in someway and really showcases how far Abstract has come in just a year, looking back at the mixed-reception on his sophomore album, American Boyfriend: A Suburban Love Story, released just last fall. Since then, Abstract sounds more confident as a performer and has incredibly impressive verses (JUNKY) and hooks (JELLO) all throughout Saturation II. But as talented and visionary as Abstract is, he doesn’t steal the spotlight away from Brockhampton. Members, JOBA, Ameer Vann, Merlyn Wood, Matt Champion, Bearface, and Dom McLennon all have moments throughout every song where they steal the song with their unique styles and undeniably talents.

JOBA has one of the most unique moments with his verse on the back end of SWEET. Mixing falsetto vocals with aggressive bars, it sounds like an anomaly in hip-hop music today. Ameer Vann delivers confessional bars coated with a silk smooth flow that has made him a fan-favorite of the group. TEETH gives Vann a track all to himself where his aggressiveness gradually increases over a slightly haunting sample of “ooo’s” FIGHT shows Vann at his most confessional as it does Dom McLennon. McLennon has often been referred to as the most technical out of Brockhampton and for good reason. McLennon has a knack for quick bars with honesty winded in his rapid rhymes. Such as the blink-and-you’ll-miss-it verse McLennon delivers at the end of JUNKY, one of the most aggressive energetic tracks on the whole album. Filled with incredible verses front to back.

No hands with the stunts / Jump off the roof like I do what I want / All of the life in my past wanna haunt / And my sight of the future beginning to taunt my ambition / Man on the moon, I’m marooned / I ain’t trippin’, I’m on a mission”

Tracks like QUEER and SWEET showcases the dynamic nature of member Merlyn Wood, who yelps his verses with an infectious energy. Wood demonstrates this perfectly on QUEER with a message:

“First off fuck Dolce & Gabbana / Racist mothersuckers tryna be my father / Put that on me auntie and me mama / Grab the Ghost then I go right back to Ghana”

Or the more light-hearted verse in SWEET

 “Don’t call me stupid, that ain’t the way my name pronounced / Don’t call me Cupid, I got too many hoes right now / Poolside in Houston, tryna see if Beyonce will take me for adoption / Broke-ass rich suburbs”

Matt Champion, another fan favorite always delivers with confessional lyrics that are masked by an undeniably swagger, such as his verse in JUNKY

My mom’s no alcoholic, she just wanna drown her sorrows / Love her to death and soon enough I’ll give back all I borrowed”

“Where the respect? Is your ass human? / I look you in your eyes, say “fuck you, are you fuckin’ stupid? / Respect my mother, ‘spect my sister, ‘spect these women, boy”

While Saturation II tends to be fueled by energy, there are few cuts that capture the woozy R&B sound perfectly, such as SUNNY or Bearface’s masterpiece, SUMMER which features such an infectious guitar lick that it evokes emotion. Moving from an energetic track like SWEET to a slower ballad like GAMBA may be the only moment in the entire album that any momentum is lost at all. GAMBA is a love-sick ballad with a sticky repetitive hook from Abstract. If there was a weakest track on Saturation II, this would be it but it’s still an impressive track overall in the grand scheme of hip-hop today.

Saturation II is one of the strongest albums of this year. It’s a refreshing break from the rinse-wash-repeat formula of hip-hop that has been so dominant this year. Brockhampton is filled with so much talent in every member and their latest offering demonstrates such a cohesive collaboration from every member that it makes you wonder where they can go from this and how quickly it’ll be before everyone is familiar with America’s hottest new boyband.

9/10

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ALBUM REVIEW: Brockhampton – Saturation

By Ryan Martin (@RyanMartin182)

Preceding last year’s All-American Trash mixtape, Brockhampton, the boy band from Texas, break down the door on the opener of their debut album, Saturation. Opening with one of the many unstoppable singles released before the album, Heat has elements reminiscent of the punk attitude Odd Future carried in their prime and the hardcore sound Rage Against the Machine had. While it’s clear Brockhampton have many influences (they have a track named 2Pac), they bring a fresh new energy to the table through their music and visuals.

Dancing between banging hip-hop tracks and turn of the millennium pop music, Saturation is all over the place and doesn’t settle on a specific sound. Going from the intensity of Heat to the laid-back braggadocio of Gold feels like an unnatural transition but still carries momentum. The backbone of Gold is the Pharrell-esque hook which is repeated throughout the track and flows like butter over the beat. Star follows and is one of the best tracks on the album. All three members of the collective murder their verses with name-drops and flow change ups. Kevin Abstract, the leader of Brockhampton, incorporates personal lyrics about his sexuality and love for pop-star Shawn Mendes, resulting in one of the most incredible verses on the whole project. Within the first 4 tracks of the album, it becomes apparent that while the project may be scattered in sound, the chemistry of the collective is undeniable and what makes the songs succeed in the way they do.

Abstract has stated on his Twitter that the project is about member Robert’s story, with the skits on the album and the intros to each video accompanying the album starring him. The skits usually follow the same formula as the intros to the videos and have Robert introduce himself and state a fact about himself or the situation he is currently in. The third skit captures more of what Robert’s story actually is, which is trying to find others that you connect with and finding a place where you feel you actually belong. Much of this can be directed back at the lyrics on the album in songs like Milk where Abstract croons over the hook:

 I gotta get better at being me (Being who I am) I gotta get better at everything (Being who I am) I just want a friend that I can hang out with (Being who I am) Someone I can sit around, lay on my couch with (Being who I am)

 Milk is an especially honest track for members featured Ameer Vann, Merlyn Wood and Abstract. The verses are direct and highlight past struggles and insecurities. The personal lyrics on Saturation is where the album connects where it doesn’t in sound. There are much more pop songs than there are songs like Heat and Star, The aggressive flow of both tracks can be found in spurts throughout the album, with not many other songs having a similar tone. Bump is a minor exception with an awkward hook by Abstract with hard hitting verses surrounding him. The hook takes away from the vibe of the track and is one of the most lackluster on the whole project.

Much like Abstract’s last release, his sophomore solo album, American Boyfriend: A Suburban Love Story, traces of indie rock can be found throughout the album in songs like Swim and the gentle closer, Waste. The incorporation of indie rock can be a hit or miss with Abstract. With both tracks mentioned, they add a level of depth while bringing a bright summer theme to the project.

Saturation is much more cohesive than last year’s All-American Trash and highlights the group’s chemistry more than ever. Where it falls flats is when tracks become cluttered with ideas with vocal distortions and clumsy additions that restrict members from shining on their own. Overall, Brockhampton’s debut is a solid offering that can attract new fans and bring excitement for what the group is going to do next, which is a sequel to Saturation, due out later this summer.

8/10


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